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Family violence intervention guidelines : child and partner abuse Fanslow, Janet L.

By: Fanslow, Janet L.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington Ministry of Health 2002Description: 90 p. ; computer file : PDF format (883Kb).ISBN: 0478255276.Subject(s): DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | GUIDELINES | HEALTH SERVICES | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | PHYSICAL ABUSE | SCREENING | NEW ZEALAND | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | CHILD ABUSE | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSEDDC classification: 362.8292 FAN Online resources: Click here to access online | 2016 guidelines Summary: Note: These guidelines have been revised and updated, with the publication of the Family violence assessment and intervention guideline in June 2016 (#5067). These health professional guidelines are a practical tool to aid health care providers in the intervention and prevention of interpersonal and family violence in a range of health care settings. It has been recognised that health care workers can play a significant role in the early identification of abuse. The guidelines were developed in consultation with health care professionals, Maori and Pacific peoples, and through a wide review of New Zealand and international protocols of care. The guidelines are set out in two main sections, and look specifically at identifying and responding to child abuse and partner abuse. Each section outlines a six-step assessment and response model, which includes identifying the presence of abuse, providing brief intervention and emotional support for the victim, assessing immediate risk for the victim, documentation and collection of physical evidence, and referral of the victim to external agencies where necessary. Additionally, as statistics show an increased occurrence of child abuse where partner abuse is present, guidelines are provided to address these issues concurrently. The guidelines also take into consideration family violence in Maori and Pacific communities, and suggest actions for intervention in these contexts. The Maori model for health, Te Whare Tapa Wha, is recognised as a valuable tool in understanding the impact of abuse, as this model provides a holistic approach, incorporating the spiritual, mental, physical, and extended family aspects. A number of appendices are incorporated at the end of the guidelines, including risk indicators, signs and symptoms, assessment questions, sample documentation forms, permission and referral forms, a safety plan, and excerpts from relevant legislation.
Item type Current location Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode
Report Report TRO 362.8292 FAN Available FV16080081
Access online Access online Online Available ON12070184
Report Report TRO 362.8292 FAN Available Spiral bound, with tabs FV11120777
Report Report TRO 362.8292 FAN Available Spiral bound, with tabs A00637165B

Note: These guidelines have been revised and updated, with the publication of the Family violence assessment and intervention guideline in June 2016 (#5067). These health professional guidelines are a practical tool to aid health care providers in the intervention and prevention of interpersonal and family violence in a range of health care settings. It has been recognised that health care workers can play a significant role in the early identification of abuse. The guidelines were developed in consultation with health care professionals, Maori and Pacific peoples, and through a wide review of New Zealand and international protocols of care. The guidelines are set out in two main sections, and look specifically at identifying and responding to child abuse and partner abuse. Each section outlines a six-step assessment and response model, which includes identifying the presence of abuse, providing brief intervention and emotional support for the victim, assessing immediate risk for the victim, documentation and collection of physical evidence, and referral of the victim to external agencies where necessary. Additionally, as statistics show an increased occurrence of child abuse where partner abuse is present, guidelines are provided to address these issues concurrently. The guidelines also take into consideration family violence in Maori and Pacific communities, and suggest actions for intervention in these contexts. The Maori model for health, Te Whare Tapa Wha, is recognised as a valuable tool in understanding the impact of abuse, as this model provides a holistic approach, incorporating the spiritual, mental, physical, and extended family aspects. A number of appendices are incorporated at the end of the guidelines, including risk indicators, signs and symptoms, assessment questions, sample documentation forms, permission and referral forms, a safety plan, and excerpts from relevant legislation.

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