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Māori women and work : the effects of family violence on Māori women's employment opportunities Pouwhare, Tania

By: Pouwhare, Tania.
Contributor(s): National Collective of Independent Women's Refuges Inc.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, N.Z. National Collective of Independent Women's Refuges Ltd 1999Description: 54 p.Subject(s): DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ECONOMIC CONDITIONS | EDUCATION | EMPLOYMENT | MAORI | SOCIAL CONDITIONS | WOMENDDC classification: 305.48 MAO Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: This report discusses and analyses the effects of family violence on Maori women's employment opportunities. The research was undertaken through individual interviews and focus groups with 30 women and is framed within the wider context of Maori women's experiences of employment and family violence. The report argues that both employment and education policies have increasingly marginalised Maori women and that family violence intensifies this marginalisation. This is seen in unemployment and family violence statistics, in which Maori women are consistently over-represented. The author also argues that in addition to the negative health and wellbeing outcomes that family violence presents to women, Maori women's employment is affected through their partner coming to their workplace and creating scenes, increased sick days recovering from violent episodes, and lower productivity due to the stress of always being aware of their partner's potential to be violent.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Report Report TRO 305.48 MAO Available FV11120702
Report Report TRO 305.48 MAO Available A00637491B
Access online Access online Online Available ON13010024

This report discusses and analyses the effects of family violence on Maori women's employment opportunities. The research was undertaken through individual interviews and focus groups with 30 women and is framed within the wider context of Maori women's experiences of employment and family violence. The report argues that both employment and education policies have increasingly marginalised Maori women and that family violence intensifies this marginalisation. This is seen in unemployment and family violence statistics, in which Maori women are consistently over-represented. The author also argues that in addition to the negative health and wellbeing outcomes that family violence presents to women, Maori women's employment is affected through their partner coming to their workplace and creating scenes, increased sick days recovering from violent episodes, and lower productivity due to the stress of always being aware of their partner's potential to be violent.

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