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Lightning does strike twice: preventing sexual revictimisation Ministry of Women's Affairs

By: New Zealand. Ministry of Women's Affairs.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, N.Z.: Ministry of Women's Affairs, 2012Description: iv, 56 p; electronic document (73 p.): PDF file: 1.10 MB.ISBN: 9780478355178 (spiral binding) .Subject(s): ADULT SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ABUSE | INTERVENTION | MĀORI | SEX CRIMES | RAPE | STATISTICS | TRAUMA | WOMEN | YOUNG WOMEN | NEW ZEALAND | DISABLED PEOPLE | PREVENTION | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSEDDC classification: 364.153 LIG Online resources: Click here to access online Summary: Key findings include that sexual revictimisation is common; sexual revictimisation often co-occurs with other forms of violence; the cumulative impacts of sexual and multiple victimisation are profound; co-occurring risk factors work together to increase vulnerability; and there is a need to further trial and evaluate promising practices to prevent sexual revictimisation. On the basis of the New Zealand and international literature reviewed, the authors estimate that: •at least 50 percent of girls and women who are sexually assaulted are likely to be sexually revictimised •victim/survivors of childhood sexual abuse are twice as likely as non-victims to be sexually assaulted later in life. Identifying action areas for change, the authors state, "Effective interventions for sexual revictimisation are based on an understanding of the connections between different forms of gender-based violence, how violence overlaps with other forms of disadvantage and discrimination, and the profound impacts of cumulative trauma. They are targeted towards early intervention for vulnerable groups, such as Māori, girls and adolescents and young women, and women with disabilities. In the case of girls who are exposed to CSA, interventions are potentially delivered again at high-risk periods such as adolescence, to empower young women before they begin adult sexual relationships" [From Executive Summary].
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Report Report TRO 364.153 LIG Available FV13090538
Report Report TRO 364.153 LIG Available FV13090539
Access online Access online Online Available ON12100514

Key findings include that sexual revictimisation is common; sexual revictimisation often co-occurs with other forms of violence; the cumulative impacts of sexual and multiple victimisation are profound; co-occurring risk factors work together to increase vulnerability; and there is a need to further trial and evaluate promising practices to prevent sexual revictimisation.

On the basis of the New Zealand and international literature reviewed, the authors estimate that:

•at least 50 percent of girls and women who are sexually assaulted are likely to be sexually revictimised
•victim/survivors of childhood sexual abuse are twice as likely as non-victims to be sexually assaulted later in life.
Identifying action areas for change, the authors state, "Effective interventions for sexual revictimisation are based on an understanding of the connections between different forms of gender-based violence, how violence overlaps with other forms of disadvantage and discrimination, and the profound impacts of cumulative trauma. They are targeted towards early intervention for vulnerable groups, such as Māori, girls and adolescents and young women, and women with disabilities. In the case of girls who are exposed to CSA, interventions are potentially delivered again at high-risk periods such as adolescence, to empower young women before they begin adult sexual relationships" [From Executive Summary].