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Sibling sexual abuse Mary Strathopoulos

By: Stathopoulos, Mary.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: ACSSA research summary.Publisher: Melbourne, Vic.:: Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault, 2012Description: electronic document (18 p.); PDF file (667.65 KB), HTML.ISBN: 978-1-922038-10-4.Subject(s): COUNSELLING | SEXUAL ABUSE | SIBLINGS | FAMILY COUNSELLING | SIBLING ABUSE | AUSTRALIA | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSEOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website In: ACSSA research summary, 3, October 2012Summary: "Sibling sexual abuse is a hidden and often under-reported form of sexual abuse. Studies indicate that sibling sexual abuse is more prevalent than other types of intra-familial sexual abuse. Due to the mostly close relationship and physical proximity between siblings, sibling sexual abuse is considered an opportunistic form of abuse. Abusive siblings are often displaying problematic sexual behaviours or developmentally inappropriate behaviours that may be the result of victimisation they have encountered themselves - either witnessed or experienced. Abused siblings often do not disclose being abused due, among other things, to fear of not being believed, fear of upsetting parents, or confusion over their role in the abuse. Current therapeutic frameworks suggest providing counselling for the whole family." (From the website). This ACSSA Research Summary looks the available research in this field.
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Access online Access online Family Violence library
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ACSSA research summary, 3, October 2012

"Sibling sexual abuse is a hidden and often under-reported form of sexual abuse. Studies indicate that sibling sexual abuse is more prevalent than other types of intra-familial sexual abuse. Due to the mostly close relationship and physical proximity between siblings, sibling sexual abuse is considered an opportunistic form of abuse. Abusive siblings are often displaying problematic sexual behaviours or developmentally inappropriate behaviours that may be the result of victimisation they have encountered themselves - either witnessed or experienced. Abused siblings often do not disclose being abused due, among other things, to fear of not being believed, fear of upsetting parents, or confusion over their role in the abuse. Current therapeutic frameworks suggest providing counselling for the whole family." (From the website). This ACSSA Research Summary looks the available research in this field.