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Addressing women's victimisation histories in custodial settings Mary Stathopoulos with contributions from Antonia Quadara, Bianca Fileborn and Haley Clark

By: Stathopoulos, Mary.
Contributor(s): Quadara, Antonia | Fileborn, Bianca | Clark, Haley.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: ACSSA issues.Publisher: Melbourne, Vic.: Australian Centre for the Study of Sexual Assault, 2012Description: 20 p.; 30 cm electronic document (20 p. ; PDF file: 682 KB.ISBN: 9781922038142.ISSN: 1833-7856 (print); 1833-7864 (online).Subject(s): ADULT SURVIVORS OF SEXUAL ABUSE | ABUSED WOMEN | INTERVENTION | MENTAL HEALTH | OFFENDERS | PHYSICAL ABUSE | PRISONERS | SUBSTANCE ABUSE | TRAUMA | AUSTRALIA | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSEOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website In: ACSSA issues, 2012, no.13Summary: In the last 20 years the numbers of women entering Australian prisons have risen dramatically. Many of these women have a history of sexual assault traumatisation from child sexual abuse as well as physical and sexual abuse they have encountered as adults. The prison system can often exacerbate trauma for female criminal offenders with a trauma history. This paper explores the prison as a possible site of re-traumatisation. The reasoning behind this is that prisons are built on an ethos of power, surveillance and control, yet trauma sufferers require safety in order to begin healing. A trauma-informed approach may offer an alternative to delivering a less traumatic prison environment and experience for female criminal offenders with a history of sexual abuse and assault. (Abstract from website)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Short paper Short paper Family Violence library
TRVF000146 Available FV13010063
Access online Access online Family Violence library
Online Available ON13010064

ACSSA issues, 2012, no.13

In the last 20 years the numbers of women entering Australian prisons have risen dramatically. Many of these women have a history of sexual assault traumatisation from child sexual abuse as well as physical and sexual abuse they have encountered as adults. The prison system can often exacerbate trauma for female criminal offenders with a trauma history. This paper explores the prison as a possible site of re-traumatisation. The reasoning behind this is that prisons are built on an ethos of power, surveillance and control, yet trauma sufferers require safety in order to begin healing. A trauma-informed approach may offer an alternative to delivering a less traumatic prison environment and experience for female criminal offenders with a history of sexual abuse and assault. (Abstract from website)