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The turning of the tide : a Whānau Ora Crime and Crash Prevention Strategy 2012/13 - 2017/18 developed by the Police Commissioner's Māori Focus Forum

By: New Zealand Police | Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, N.Z. : New Zealand Police, 2012Description: electronic document (12 p.); PDF file: 2.56 MB.Subject(s): New Zealand Police | Ngā Pirihimana o Aotearoa | GOVERNMENT POLICY | CRIME PREVENTION | MĀORI | VICTIMS OF CRIMES | KAUPAPA | PĀRURENGA | PIRIHIMANA | PŪNAHA TURE TAIHARA | RAUTAKI | WHĀNAU ORAOnline resources: Click here to access online | Read media release Summary: This strategy was developed by the Police Commissioner's Māori Focus Forum, consisting of senior Iwi representatives from around the country, with help from Police. It is based on Iwi Crime and Crash Plans drawn up by Te Arawa, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Whātua and Tainui and has been strongly endorsed by iwi leaders around the country. (from the media release, 13/12/2012). Ā Tātau Mahi The strategy includes a focus on: reducing male absenteeism, improving child supervision, keeping kids in schools and boosting parenting skills. Objectives include reducing apprehensions of Māori that result in prosecutions and the number of repeat victims who are Māori.
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Released: 13 December 2012

This strategy was developed by the Police Commissioner's Māori Focus Forum, consisting of senior Iwi representatives from around the country, with help from Police. It is based on Iwi Crime and Crash Plans drawn up by Te Arawa, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Whātua and Tainui and has been strongly endorsed by iwi leaders around the country. (from the media release, 13/12/2012).

Ā Tātau Mahi
The strategy includes a focus on: reducing male absenteeism, improving child supervision, keeping kids in schools and boosting parenting skills.

Objectives include reducing apprehensions of Māori that result in prosecutions and the number of repeat victims who are Māori.