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Traditional Māori parenting : an historical review of literature of traditional Māori child rearing practices in pre-European times Kuni Jenkins and Helen Mountain Harte

By: Jenkins, Kuni.
Contributor(s): Harte, Helen M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, N.Z. : Te Kahui Mana Ririki, 2011Description: electronic document (59 p.); PDF file: 1.0 MB.Subject(s): CHILD REARING | DISCIPLINE | HISTORY | MĀORI | MĀTUA | PARENTING | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAMARIKI | TIKANGA TUKU IHO | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: This report is based on a review of literature exploring Māori parenting practices and the philosophy supporting these practices before 1642. This knowledge can be found in the whakapapa, the tipuna (ancestral) links to the spiritual world, the purakau (oral histories), the waiata oriori (lullabies), whakatauki (proverbs), and ngā kōrero iwi (tribal stories). In all of this literature, the tikanga (rules, custom, methods) of parenting are signposted. The purpose of this report is to research the traditional, pre-European settlement, Māori child rearing and parenting practices, with particular reference to socialisation and discipline. The research will show how these practices might form or do form the basis for a 21st century kaupapa of parenting for Māori and potentially for other New Zealanders.(from the Executive abstract)
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This report is based on a review of literature exploring Māori parenting practices and the philosophy supporting these practices before 1642. This knowledge can be found in the
whakapapa, the tipuna (ancestral) links to the spiritual world, the purakau (oral histories), the waiata oriori (lullabies), whakatauki (proverbs), and ngā kōrero iwi (tribal stories). In all of this literature, the tikanga (rules, custom, methods) of parenting are signposted. The purpose of this report is to research the traditional, pre-European settlement, Māori child
rearing and parenting practices, with particular reference to socialisation and discipline. The research will show how these practices might form or do form the basis for a 21st century
kaupapa of parenting for Māori and potentially for other New Zealanders.(from the Executive abstract)