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Why do some men use violence against women and how can we prevent it? : quantitative findings from the United Nations Multi-country Study on Men and Violence in Asia and the Pacific Emma Fulu, Xian Warner, Stephanie Miedema, Rachel Jewkes, Tim Roselli and James Lang

By: Fulu, Emma.
Contributor(s): Warner, Xizn | Miedema, Stephanie | Jewkes, Rachel | Roselli, Tim | Lang, James.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Bangkok, Thailand : UNDP UNFPA UN Women UN Volunteers, 2013Description: electronic document (120 p.); PDF file: 4.64 MB.Subject(s): SEXUAL VIOLENCE | INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON | RECOMMENDED READING | ABUSIVE MEN | ATTITUDES | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | GENDER | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MASCULINITY | PERPETRATORS | PREVALENCE | PHYSICAL ABUSE | PRIMARY PREVENTION | RAPE | RISK FACTORS | SEXUAL ABUSE | SOCIAL CONDITIONS | SURVEYS | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | YOUNG MEN | YOUNG PEOPLE | ASIA | BANGLADESH | CAMBODIA | CHINA | INDONESIA | PAPUA NEW GUINEA | SRI LANKAOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website
Contents:
--Introduction -- Methodology -- Prevalence and patterns of intimate partner violence perpetration: men's and women's responses -- Non-partner and partner rape perpetration: prevalence, motivations and consequences -- Men's gender norms, attitudes, household practices and experiences with violence and adversity -- Factors associated with male perpetration of non-partner rape -- Understanding the factors associated with men's violence in a broader social context - Recommendations
Summary: This UN multi-country study of 10,000 men in Asia and the Pacific (Papua New Guinea only), found that overall nearly half of those men interviewed reported using physical and/or sexual violence against a female partner, ranging from 26 percent to 80 percent across the sites studied. Nearly a quarter of men interviewed reported perpetrating rape against a woman or girl, ranging from 10 percent to 62 percent across the sites. Men were interviewed across nine sites in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Papua New Guinea. The study was conducted by Partners for Prevention, a regional joint programme of the UN Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), UN Women and United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme in Asia and the Pacific. It asked men about their use and experiences of violence, gendered attitudes and practices, childhood, sexuality, family life and health. Annexes I, II and III and the statistical appendix are available online - use the website link.
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Recommended reading

--Introduction -- Methodology -- Prevalence and patterns of intimate partner violence perpetration: men's and women's responses -- Non-partner and partner rape perpetration: prevalence, motivations and consequences -- Men's gender norms, attitudes, household practices and experiences with violence and adversity -- Factors associated with male perpetration of non-partner rape -- Understanding the factors associated with men's violence in a broader social context - Recommendations

This UN multi-country study of 10,000 men in Asia and the Pacific (Papua New Guinea only), found that overall nearly half of those men interviewed reported using physical and/or sexual violence against a female partner, ranging from 26 percent to 80 percent across the sites studied. Nearly a quarter of men interviewed reported perpetrating rape against a woman or girl, ranging from 10 percent to 62 percent across the sites.

Men were interviewed across nine sites in Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Sri Lanka and Papua New Guinea. The study was conducted by Partners for Prevention, a regional joint programme of the UN Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), UN Women and United Nations Volunteers (UNV) programme in Asia and the Pacific. It asked men about their use and experiences of violence, gendered attitudes and practices, childhood, sexuality, family life and health.

Annexes I, II and III and the statistical appendix are available online - use the website link.