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Productivity gains from workplace protection of victims of domestic violence Sherilee Kahui, Bryan Ku, Suzanne Snively. Project commissioned by the PSA.

By: Kahui, Sherilee.
Contributor(s): Ku, Bryan | Snively, Suzanne.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, N.Z. : MoreMedia Enterprises, 2014Description: electronic document (65 p.): PDF file: 986.01 KB.Subject(s): RECOMMENDED READING | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ECONOMIC ASPECTS | EMPLOYMENT | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | LEGISLATION | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | WORKPLACE | ECONOMIC COSTSOnline resources: Click here to access online | Media release Summary: The PSA commissioned this report to examine the impact of workplace protection on domestic violence victims, other staff and colleagues, the employer and overall productivity. "Experience in New Zealand to date indicates that there are barriers to the implementation of workplace protections. These barriers are due in part to current attitudes towards workplace Health and Safety training which can overstate the costs and understate the benefits from lower costs of recruitment, retention and retraining. A framework has been developed for this project that specifies the determinants of these costs and then proceeds to calculate them. These include the costs to find a replacement worker and the average annual cost of training when a victim’s employment is terminated by her employer. In 2014, $153 million is estimated to be lost across the New Zealand workforce due to these two factors. This is an under estimation of the total cost of victims leaving their employment as the effect of women resigning their current job has not been taken into account."
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The PSA commissioned this report to examine the impact of workplace protection on domestic violence victims, other staff and colleagues, the employer and overall productivity.

"Experience in New Zealand to date indicates that there are barriers to the implementation of workplace protections. These barriers are due in part to current attitudes towards workplace Health and Safety training which can overstate the costs and understate the benefits from lower costs of recruitment, retention and retraining. A framework has been developed for this project that specifies the determinants of these costs and then proceeds to calculate them. These include the costs to find a replacement worker and the average annual cost of training when a victim’s employment is terminated by her employer. In 2014, $153 million is estimated to be lost across the New Zealand workforce due to these two factors. This is an under estimation of the total cost of victims leaving their employment as the effect of women resigning their current job has not been taken into account."