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Battered women charged with homicide in Australia, Canada and New Zealand : How do they fare? Elizabeth Sheehy, Julie Stubbs and Julia Tolmie

By: Sheehy, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s): Stubbs, Julie | Tolmie, Julia.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology.Publisher: Sage, 2013Description: electronic document (26 p.); 354.07 KB.Subject(s): DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | HOMICIDE | JUSTICE | LEGISLATION | SELF DEFENCE | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | WOMEN | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | AUSTRALIA | NEW ZEALAND | LAW | CANADAOnline resources: Read the abstract In: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 2012, 45(3) 383–399Summary: This article examines trends in the resolution of homicide cases involving battered women defendants from 2000 to 2010 in Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Australia and Canada appear to have some commonalities in their treatment of such cases with higher acquittal rates and a greater reliance on plea bargaining to produce manslaughter verdicts, as compared with New Zealand. Although New Zealand’s small number of cases makes it difficult to generalise, its overall trends appear to be different from those observed in Australia and Canada, in both the high proportion of cases proceeding to trial and those resulting in conviction for murder. (from the abstract). See also record #3980 - full text available for that item.
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Australian & New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 2012, 45(3) 383–399

This article examines trends in the resolution of homicide cases involving battered women defendants from 2000 to 2010 in Australia, Canada and New Zealand. Australia and Canada
appear to have some commonalities in their treatment of such cases with higher acquittal rates and a greater reliance on plea bargaining to produce manslaughter verdicts, as compared with New Zealand. Although New Zealand’s small number of cases makes it difficult to generalise, its overall trends appear to be different from those observed in Australia and Canada, in both the high proportion of cases proceeding to trial and those resulting in conviction for murder. (from the abstract). See also record #3980 - full text available for that item.