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An outcome evaluation of Police Safety Orders prepared by Dr Elaine Mossman, Dr Venezia Kingi and Nan Wehipeihana

By: Mossman, Elaine.
Contributor(s): Kingi, Venezia | Wehipeihana, Nan.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : New Zealand Police, 2015Description: electronic document (120 pages); PDF file: 1.37 MB.Subject(s): DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | POLICE PROCEDURES | POLICE SAFETY ORDERS | LEGISLATION | EVALUATION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Media release Summary: On 1 July 2010, Police Safety Orders (PSOs) were introduced as a new tool for Police in dealing with family violence. They enable frontline officers to take immediate action to protect victims of family violence when there is insufficient evidence for an arrest. PSOs are instant orders that require the primary aggressor (Bound Person) to leave the residence and not return or contact the victim(s) (Person/s At Risk) for a prescribed period of time (maximum duration five days). The evaluation assessed the extent to which PSOs achieve their intended short- and longer-term outcomes with specific reference to the following four evaluation objectives: Objective 1: To use available data to gauge the extent to which the use of PSOs increase the immediate safety of the victim/children Objective 2: To investigate whether the use of PSOs achieves the compliance of the Bound Person1 Objective 3: To investigate the likelihood of whether the use of PSOs contributes to a reduction in re-victimisation Objective 4: To identify any unintended outcomes arising as a result of issuing/serving PSOs. (from the Executive summary). Record #4683
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On 1 July 2010, Police Safety Orders (PSOs) were introduced as a new tool for Police in dealing with family violence. They enable frontline officers to take immediate action to protect victims of family violence when there is insufficient evidence for an arrest. PSOs are instant orders that require the primary aggressor (Bound Person) to leave the residence and not return or contact the victim(s) (Person/s At Risk) for a prescribed period of time (maximum duration five days).
The evaluation assessed the extent to which PSOs achieve their intended short- and longer-term outcomes with specific reference to the following four evaluation objectives: Objective 1: To use available data to gauge the extent to which the use of PSOs increase the immediate safety of the victim/children Objective 2: To investigate whether the use of PSOs achieves the compliance of the Bound Person1 Objective 3: To investigate the likelihood of whether the use of PSOs contributes to a reduction in re-victimisation Objective 4: To identify any unintended outcomes arising as a result of issuing/serving PSOs. (from the Executive summary). Record #4683