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Developing intimate partner violence intervention services for youth from migrant communities of colour : David Tokiharu Mayeda and Raagini Vijaykumara technical report for Shakti Community Council, Inc. based on interviews with youth from Asian and Middle Eastern communities in Auckland, New Zealand

By: Mayeda, David T.
Contributor(s): Vijaykumar, Raagini.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : University of Auckland, 2015Description: electronic document (64 pages); PDF file: 7.13 MB.Subject(s): Shakti | CULTURE | RECOMMENDED READING | ADOLESCENTS | ASIAN PEOPLES | ATTITUDES | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MIDDLE EASTERN PEOPLES | MIGRANTS | PARENT ADOLESCENT RELATIONSHIP | YOUNG PEOPLE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: Despite significant growth of migrant families from Asia, the Middle East and Africa in New Zealand, research on IPV with these communities is thin. Additionally, over the last two years, media has reported the deaths of at least three migrant women of colour, killed allegedly by their domestic partners. These tragedies and other forms of IPV transpiring behind closed doors call for action-based research with New Zealand’s migrant communities of colour. This report stems from a community-driven, mixed methods research project conducted with 27 young women and adolescent girls from Auckland, New Zealand who provided their perspectives on the ways that IPV is experienced and understood in migrant Asian and Middle Eastern communities. The report first overviews quantitative survey data, highlighting participants’ attitudes toward IPV and victimisation rates. Subsequently, the report turns to qualitative interviews with participants, outlining how young people from these ethnic communities define and learn intimate partner and family violence, develop identities facilitating IPV, and cope with cultural codes tied to honour and shame. The report closes with recommendations for youth programmes that aim to aid and educate migrant youth on intimate partner and family violence. (from the Executive summary). Record #4878
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Despite significant growth of migrant families from Asia, the Middle East and Africa in New Zealand, research on IPV with these communities is thin. Additionally, over the last two years, media has reported the deaths of at least three migrant women of colour, killed allegedly by their domestic partners. These tragedies and other forms of IPV transpiring behind closed doors call for action-based research with New Zealand’s migrant communities of colour. This report stems from a community-driven, mixed methods research project conducted with 27 young women and adolescent girls from Auckland, New Zealand who provided their perspectives on the ways that IPV is experienced and understood in migrant Asian and Middle Eastern communities.
The report first overviews quantitative survey data, highlighting participants’ attitudes toward IPV and victimisation rates. Subsequently, the report turns to qualitative interviews with participants, outlining how young people from these ethnic communities define and learn intimate partner and family violence, develop identities facilitating IPV, and cope with cultural codes tied to honour and shame. The report closes with recommendations for youth programmes that aim to aid and educate migrant youth on intimate partner and family violence. (from the Executive summary). Record #4878