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Brief on violence against sexual and gender minority women : Violence Against Women and Girls resource guide Phil Crehan and Jennifer McCleary-Sills

By: Crehan, Phil.
Contributor(s): McCleary-Sills, Jennifer.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: VAWG resource guide.Publisher: World Bank ; Global Women's Institute ; Inter-American Development Bank ; International Center for Research on Women 2015Description: electronic document (29 pages); PDF file: 1.5 MB.Subject(s): World Bank | Global Women's Institute | Inter-American Development Bank | International Center for Research on Women | BISEXUAL | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | GENDER | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | LESBIAN | LGBTIQ | SEXUAL ORIENTATION | TRANSGENDER | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | PREVENTION | SEXUAL VIOLENCEOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website VAWG resource guide, September 2015Summary: The term “sexual minorities” refers to individuals whose sexual orientation is outside the heterosexual mainstream. “Sexual minority women” refers to women who identify as lesbian or bisexual. Yet it also encompasses those who participate in an array of non-heterosexual acts, also called “same-sex loving women”. “Gender minorities” are individuals whose gender identity/expression does not fit into the distinct categories of male or female, or “cisgender”.1 This encompasses transgender identities, as well as those exhibiting a non-conforming expression of gender. This term includes “third gender” individuals because their identity does not fit into the gender binary. This brief uses the term “LBT women” to refer to lesbians, bisexual women, and transgender women. A sub-category of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population, “LBT” focuses on homosexual and bisexual women as well as transgender individuals with a female gender identity and expression. This is one brief from the resource guide which was developed through a partnership between the Global Women’s Institute (GWI) at George Washington University, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and the World Bank Group (WBG). The primary audiences for the guide are IDB and WBG staff and member countries, as well as other development professionals who do not yet have experience addressing VAWG. The purpose of this guide is to provide the reader with basic information on the characteristics and consequences of VAWG, including the operational implications that VAWG can have in several priority sectors of the IDB and WBG. It also offers guidance on how to integrate VAWG prevention and provide quality services to violence survivors across a range of development projects. Lastly, it recommends strategies for integrating VAWG prevention and response into policies and legislation, as well as sector programs and projects. (from the Resource guide). Record #4882
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VAWG resource guide, September 2015

The term “sexual minorities” refers to individuals whose sexual orientation is outside the heterosexual mainstream. “Sexual minority women” refers to women who identify as lesbian or bisexual. Yet it also encompasses those who participate in an array of non-heterosexual acts, also called “same-sex loving women”.
“Gender minorities” are individuals whose gender identity/expression does not fit into the distinct categories of male or female, or “cisgender”.1 This encompasses transgender identities, as well as those exhibiting a non-conforming expression of gender. This term includes “third gender” individuals because their identity does not fit into the gender binary. This brief uses the term “LBT women” to refer to lesbians, bisexual women, and transgender women. A sub-category of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) population, “LBT” focuses on homosexual and bisexual women as well as transgender individuals with a female gender identity and expression. This is one brief from the resource guide which was developed through a partnership between the Global Women’s Institute (GWI) at George Washington University, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and the World Bank Group (WBG). The primary audiences for the guide are IDB and WBG staff and member countries, as well as other development professionals who do not yet have experience addressing VAWG. The purpose of this guide is to provide the reader with basic information on the characteristics and consequences of VAWG, including the operational implications that VAWG can have in several priority sectors of the IDB and WBG. It also offers guidance on how to integrate VAWG prevention and provide quality services to violence survivors across a range of development projects. Lastly, it recommends strategies for integrating VAWG prevention and response into policies and legislation, as well as sector programs and projects. (from the Resource guide). Record #4882