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'Hooked up' : te hononga whaiāipo : reducing and preventing violence in taitamariki Māori intimate partner relationships Moana Margaret Eruera

By: Eruera, Moana.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2015 Description: electronic document (278 pages); PDF file: 4.5 MB.Other title: A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor in Indigenous Studies.Subject(s): PREVENTION | CULTURE | FAMILY VIOLENCE | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAU | RECOMMENDED READING | ADOLESCENT RELATIONSHIP ABUSE | ADOLESCENTS | DATING VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MĀORI | VIOLENCE | WELL-BEING | YOUNG MEN | YOUNG WOMEN | HAUORA WHANAU | KAUPAPA RANGAHAU | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAITAMARIKI | TIKANGA TUKU IHO | TUHINGA WHAKAPAE | TŪKINOTANGA | WHĀNAU | New Zealand | Ngā PuhiOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: The development of intimate partner relationships is significant in young people’s transition into adulthood (Eruera & Dobbs, 2010). The prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) amongst Māori has been an ongoing concern for Māori communities for many years (Cooper, 2012; Dobbs & Eruera, 2014; Grennell & Cram, 2008; Pihama, Jenkins & Middleton, 2003; Ruwhiu, 2009). Given the prevalence of intimate partner violence and the youthful demographic of the Māori population, there is increased focus on the significance and potential of taitamariki Māori (Māori young people) lived experiences to inform whānau violence prevention solutions and strategies for improved whānau wellbeing. This study is an indigenous whānau (extended family) violence prevention project that explores the supports taitamariki Māori identify will assist them to develop healthy intimate partner relationships. It sought to learn from taitamariki Māori their perspectives on intimate partner relationships and violence in order to co-construct an indigenous youth theory of change to inform Māori and indigenous violence prevention activities. The aim is to provide whānau, hapū (sub-tribe), iwi (tribe), and those working in the field of family violence and related sectors, with information to assist in the identification of effective strategies informed by taitamariki to support the development of taitamariki healthy partner relationships that are violence free. In turn, this will assist in reducing the increased likelihood of whānau violence as taitamariki move through their life cycle as adults and contribute to increased whānau ora (extended family wellbeing) and wellbeing for whānau, hapū and iwi Māori. Young people’s partner violence remains an understudied area of maltreatment and this omission has significantly hampered the development of effective supports, prevention strategies and programmes (Hickmen, Jaycox & Arnoff, 2004), especially for taitamariki Māori and indigenous youth. How young people learn behaviours, respond to these behaviours and normalise them or not is important to any prevention programme. Recently, violence prevention studies have been promoting the use of multi-level approaches as most likely to achieve the best results (Robertson & Oulton, 2008). However, indigenous researchers are advocating the need to ensure that multi-level approaches include historical and socio-cultural analysis to adequately consider and address violence prevention issues and solutions for indigenous peoples (Grennell & Cram, 2008). This study contributes to building this knowledge base by using an approach with three key factors. Firstly, by using the Mauri Ora framework, a Māori conceptual wellbeing framework that reinforces an ecological approach that is inclusive and prioritises sociocultural and historical considerations to the analysis and transformation of violence prevention for whānau Māori and communities. This enables the conceptualisation of a Māori theory of the problem. Secondly, this research is informed and co-constructed by taitamariki voices and solutions to ensure the theory of change reflects their world, needs, aspirations and priorities. Thirdly, the study is based in a Māori tribal authority, a critical dimension of Māori social structure within today’s society that has obligations and responsibilities for the development and wellbeing of its tribal members and the wider Māori population. Based with Te Rūnanga ā Iwi o Ngāpuhi (Ngāpuhi tribal authority), the study engaged with taitamariki Māori living within the Ngāpuhi tribal geographical boundaries and builds on a pilot study called “Taitamariki Māori korero about intimate partner violence”, in Northland, New Zealand, by Eruera and Dobbs (2010) for the Amokura Family Violence Prevention Consortium. That pilot study co-constructed with taitamariki a methodology and methods to explore this topic that have been adopted and implemented for this project. Using Kaupapa Māori methodology and the Mauri Ora framework, this study engaged with 81 taitamariki Māori, both taitamatāne (young Maori men) and taitamāhine (young Maori women) aged between 13 to 18 years to gain their understanding of taitamariki intimate partner relationships and violence. On a national level the study provides taitamariki Māori-led solutions and strategies for violence prevention in Aotearoa (New Zealand) while also highlighting effective methods to carry out research with taitamariki Māori. In a global context this project contributes to the dearth of indigenous youth literature, research and indigenous-led youth solutions for violence prevention and the development of healthy intimate partner relationships. (Whakarāpopoto / Author's abstract). Record #5104
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Thesis: Doctor in Indigenous Studies, Whakatane, New Zealand: Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi

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The development of intimate partner relationships is significant in young people’s transition into adulthood (Eruera & Dobbs, 2010). The prevalence of intimate partner violence (IPV) amongst Māori has been an ongoing concern for Māori communities for many years (Cooper, 2012; Dobbs & Eruera, 2014; Grennell & Cram, 2008; Pihama, Jenkins & Middleton, 2003; Ruwhiu, 2009). Given the prevalence of intimate partner violence and the youthful demographic of the Māori population, there is increased focus on the significance and potential of taitamariki Māori (Māori young people) lived experiences to inform whānau violence prevention solutions and strategies for improved whānau wellbeing.
This study is an indigenous whānau (extended family) violence prevention project that explores the supports taitamariki Māori identify will assist them to develop healthy intimate partner relationships. It sought to learn from taitamariki Māori their perspectives on intimate partner relationships and violence in order to co-construct an indigenous youth theory of change to inform Māori and indigenous violence prevention activities. The aim is to provide whānau, hapū (sub-tribe), iwi (tribe), and those working in the field of family violence and related sectors, with information to assist in the identification of effective strategies informed by taitamariki to support the development of taitamariki healthy partner relationships that are violence free. In turn, this will assist in reducing the increased likelihood of whānau violence as taitamariki move through their life cycle as adults and contribute to increased whānau ora (extended family wellbeing) and wellbeing for whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.
Young people’s partner violence remains an understudied area of maltreatment and this omission has significantly hampered the development of effective supports, prevention strategies and programmes (Hickmen, Jaycox & Arnoff, 2004), especially for taitamariki Māori and indigenous youth. How young people learn behaviours, respond to these behaviours and normalise them or not is important to any prevention programme. Recently, violence prevention studies have been promoting the use of multi-level approaches as most likely to achieve the best results (Robertson & Oulton, 2008). However, indigenous researchers are advocating the need to ensure that multi-level approaches include historical and socio-cultural analysis to adequately consider and address violence prevention issues and solutions for indigenous peoples (Grennell & Cram, 2008). This study contributes to building this knowledge base by using an approach with three key factors. Firstly, by using the Mauri Ora framework, a Māori conceptual wellbeing framework that reinforces an ecological approach that is inclusive and prioritises sociocultural and historical considerations to the analysis and transformation of violence prevention for whānau Māori and communities. This enables the conceptualisation of a Māori theory of the problem. Secondly, this research is informed and co-constructed by taitamariki voices and solutions to ensure the theory of change reflects their world, needs, aspirations and priorities. Thirdly, the study is based in a Māori tribal authority, a critical dimension of Māori social structure within today’s society that has obligations and responsibilities for the development and wellbeing of its tribal members and the wider Māori population.
Based with Te Rūnanga ā Iwi o Ngāpuhi (Ngāpuhi tribal authority), the study engaged with taitamariki Māori living within the Ngāpuhi tribal geographical boundaries and builds on a pilot study called “Taitamariki Māori korero about intimate partner violence”, in Northland, New Zealand, by Eruera and Dobbs (2010) for the Amokura Family Violence Prevention Consortium. That pilot study co-constructed with taitamariki a methodology and methods to explore this topic that have been adopted and implemented for this project.
Using Kaupapa Māori methodology and the Mauri Ora framework, this study engaged with 81 taitamariki Māori, both taitamatāne (young Maori men) and taitamāhine (young Maori women) aged between 13 to 18 years to gain their understanding of taitamariki intimate partner relationships and violence. On a national level the study provides taitamariki Māori-led solutions and strategies for violence prevention in Aotearoa (New Zealand) while also highlighting effective methods to carry out research with taitamariki Māori. In a global context this project contributes to the dearth of indigenous youth literature, research and indigenous-led youth solutions for violence prevention and the development of healthy intimate partner relationships. (Whakarāpopoto / Author's abstract). Record #5104