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What do young people think about their school-based sex and relationship education? : A qualitative synthesis of young people's views and experiences Pandora Pound, Rebecca Langford and Rona Campbell

By: Pound, Pandora.
Contributor(s): Langford, Rebecca | Campbell, Rona.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: BMJ Open.Publisher: BMJ, 2016Subject(s): ADOLESCENTS | CHILDREN | INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS | SEX EDUCATION | SEXUAL HEALTH | SEXUALITY | SCHOOLS | YOUNG PEOPLE | AUSTRALIA | BRAZIL | IRAN | IRELAND | JAPAN | NEW ZEALAND | SWEDEN | UNITED KINGDOM | UNITED STATES | CANADAOnline resources: Click here to access online In: BMJ Open, 2016, 6:e011329 (Open access)Summary: The authors aimed to investigate whether current provision of sex and relationship education (SRE) meets young people's needs in the United Kingdom. To do this the authors conducted a synthesis of qualitative studies of young people's views of their school-based SRE. Eligible studies originated from the UK, Ireland, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Iran, Brazil and Sweden. The authors' conclusions: "SRE should be ‘sex-positive’ and delivered by experts who maintain clear boundaries with students. Schools should acknowledge that sex is a special subject with unique challenges, as well as the fact and range of young people's sexual activity, otherwise young people will continue to disengage from SRE and opportunities for safeguarding and improving their sexual health will be reduced." (From the abstract). Record #5171
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BMJ Open, 2016, 6:e011329 (Open access)

The authors aimed to investigate whether current provision of sex and relationship education (SRE) meets young people's needs in the United Kingdom. To do this the authors conducted a synthesis of qualitative studies of young people's views of their school-based SRE. Eligible studies originated from the UK, Ireland, the USA, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Japan, Iran, Brazil and Sweden. The authors' conclusions: "SRE should be ‘sex-positive’ and delivered by experts who maintain clear boundaries with students. Schools should acknowledge that sex is a special subject with unique challenges, as well as the fact and range of young people's sexual activity, otherwise young people will continue to disengage from SRE and opportunities for safeguarding and improving their sexual health will be reduced." (From the abstract). Record #5171