Normal view MARC view ISBD view

He Pūronga Arotake: Te Whare Ruruhau o Meri | Evaluation report: Te Whare Ruruhau o Meri Kiri Parata

By: Parata, Kiri.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Te Puni Kōkiri, 2011Description: electronic document (24 pages); PDF file.ISBN: 978-0-478-34513-1.Subject(s): TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAU | WĀHINE | ABUSIVE MEN | CHILDREN | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | EVALUATION | FAMILY VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | KAUPAPA MĀORI | MĀORI | OFFENDERS | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAMARIKI | TĀNE | TANGATA HARA | WHĀNAU | WOMEN'S REFUGES | NEW ZEALAND | AUCKLANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: In 2006 the Government launched its Effective Interventions (EI) policy package, which was established to identify and support options for reducing offending and the prison population, and thereby reducing the costs and impact of crime on New Zealand society. An important component of EI was the need to enhance justice sector responsiveness to Māori. Under the Effective Interventions Initiatives, Cabinet directed Te Puni Kōkiri and the Ministry of Justice to report to Cabinet Policy Committee with a programme of action relating to Māori. As such, Te Puni Kōkiri and the Ministry of Justice developed a Programme of Action for Māori. This evaluation report looks at an initiative provided by Te Whare Ruruhau o Meri Trust. It is a programme offering support to the top ten recidivist family violence offenders in Auckland. The point of difference with this programme is that Te Whare Ruruhau works with offenders, their partners and their tamariki to deliver a comprehensive package of skills that enables whānau to make choices and changes in their lives. The success of a programme can be measured by the positive changes that whānau are able to make in their households. A large amount of effort is placed on the initial engagement with the offender and their whānau. It can take a long time for offenders to build trust in the staff and then a long time to deal with other challenges the whānau are facing before addressing the issues of violence. Often hurt can be carried for generations and acknowledging this is an important part of moving forward. The kaupapa Māori delivery of this programme is engaging for offenders and their whānau. Using Te Kawa o Te Marae as a basis for the therapy is innovative and practical. Having tools to take away from the programme as a reminder of the lessons provides support to whānau to remain strong and focussed with making changes in their lives. The programme is being watched with interest by the Police nationwide and by other communities wishing to make a difference in the lives of whānau in need. (Executive summary). Record #5566
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON17080026

In 2006 the Government launched its Effective Interventions (EI) policy package, which was established to identify and support options for reducing offending and the prison population, and thereby reducing the costs and impact of crime on New Zealand society. An important component of EI was the need to enhance justice sector responsiveness to Māori. Under the Effective Interventions Initiatives, Cabinet directed Te Puni Kōkiri and the Ministry of Justice to report to Cabinet Policy Committee with a programme of action relating to Māori. As such, Te Puni Kōkiri and the Ministry of Justice developed a Programme of Action for Māori.
This evaluation report looks at an initiative provided by Te Whare Ruruhau o Meri Trust. It is a programme offering support to the top ten recidivist family violence offenders in Auckland. The point of difference with this programme is that Te Whare Ruruhau works with offenders, their partners and their tamariki to deliver a comprehensive package of skills that enables whānau to make choices and changes in their lives.
The success of a programme can be measured by the positive changes that whānau are able to make in their households. A large amount of effort is placed on the initial engagement with the offender and their whānau. It can take a long time for offenders to build trust in the staff and then a long time to deal with other challenges the whānau are facing before addressing the issues of violence. Often hurt can be carried for generations and acknowledging this is an important part of moving forward.
The kaupapa Māori delivery of this programme is engaging for offenders and their whānau. Using Te Kawa o Te Marae as a basis for the therapy is innovative and practical. Having tools to take away from the programme as a reminder of the lessons provides support to whānau to remain strong and focussed with making changes in their lives.

The programme is being watched with interest by the Police nationwide and by other communities wishing to make a difference in the lives of whānau in need. (Executive summary). Record #5566