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What works evidence review : Andrew Gibbs, Nata Duvvury and Stacey Scriverthe relationship between poverty and intimate partner violence

By: Gibbs, Andrew.
Contributor(s): Duvvury, Nata | Scriver, Stacey.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Evidence Review.Publisher: What Works to Prevent Violence, 2017Description: electronic document (4pages); PDF format: 1.95 MB.Subject(s): DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | POVERTY | PREVENTION | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG)Online resources: Click here to access online In: What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Evidence Review, September 2017Summary: Thirty percent of women worldwide have experienced physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime. While IPV is experienced by all women regardless of their socio-economic status, poverty is a key driver of IPV at the individual level. The relationship between poverty and IPV is a reinforcing loop, with multiple pathways. Women living in poorer places with lower socio-economic status, higher food insecurity, and less access to education and work opportunities are more likely to experience IPV. In addition, women without economic and social resources find it harder to leave abusive relationships. Women who experience IPV also experience more mental health challenges, and have more unplanned pregnancies. In turn, women who experience IPV have increased costs related to IPV, which can increase household poverty. Poverty is a multidimensional concept, which includes the multiple and overlapping deprivations that constitutes people’s experience of it. This includes being excluded from social institutions, experiencing poor health, and limited education and low levels of income and consumption3. This brief focuses on low income and food insecurity, though recognising that the various dimensions of poverty are interlinked. (From the document). Record #5651
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What Works to Prevent Violence Against Women and Girls Evidence Review, September 2017

Thirty percent of women worldwide have experienced physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime. While IPV is experienced by all women regardless of their socio-economic status, poverty is a key driver of IPV at the individual level. The relationship between poverty and IPV is a reinforcing loop, with multiple pathways. Women living in poorer places with lower socio-economic status, higher food insecurity, and less access to education and work opportunities are more likely to experience IPV. In addition, women without economic and social resources find it harder to leave abusive relationships. Women who experience IPV also experience more mental health challenges, and have more unplanned pregnancies. In turn, women who experience IPV have increased costs related to IPV, which can increase household poverty.

Poverty is a multidimensional concept, which includes the multiple and overlapping deprivations that constitutes people’s experience of it. This includes being excluded from social institutions, experiencing poor health, and limited education and low levels of income and consumption3. This brief focuses on low income and food insecurity, though recognising that the various dimensions of poverty are interlinked. (From the document). Record #5651