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Conceptualising historical privilege : the flip side of historical trauma, a brief examination Belinda Borell, Helen Moewaka Barnes and Tim McCreanor

By: Borell, Belinda.
Contributor(s): Moewaka Barnes, Helen | McCreanor, Tim.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples.Publisher: Sage, 2017Subject(s): COLONISATION | HISTORICAL TRAUMA | INDIGENOUS PEOPLES | INTERGENERATIONAL TRANSMISSION | MĀORI | SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS | ĀHUATANGA PĀPORI | ĀHUATANGA TŌHANGA | IWI TAKETAKE | PĀMAMAE HEKE IHO | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAIPŪWHENUATANGA | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Read abstract In: AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Advance online publication, 17 November 2017Summary: Historical trauma is an important and growing area of research that provides crucial insights into the antecedents of current-day inequities in health and social wellbeing experienced by Indigenous people in colonial settler societies. What is not so readily examined is the flip side of historical trauma experienced by settlers and their descendants, what might be termed “historical privilege”. These historic acts of privilege for settlers, particularly those emigrating from Britain, provide the antecedents for the current-day realities for their descendants and the structural, institutional and interpersonal levels of advantage that are also a key feature of inequities between Indigenous and settler. This article theorises an explicit link between historical trauma and historical privilege and explores how the latter may be examined with particular reference to Aotearoa New Zealand. Three core elements of historical trauma are posited as a useful framework to apply to historical privilege. (Authors' abstract). Record #5686
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AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, Advance online publication, 17 November 2017

Historical trauma is an important and growing area of research that provides crucial insights into the antecedents of current-day inequities in health and social wellbeing experienced by Indigenous people in colonial settler societies. What is not so readily examined is the flip side of historical trauma experienced by settlers and their descendants, what might be termed “historical privilege”. These historic acts of privilege for settlers, particularly those emigrating from Britain, provide the antecedents for the current-day realities for their descendants and the structural, institutional and interpersonal levels of advantage that are also a key feature of inequities between Indigenous and settler. This article theorises an explicit link between historical trauma and historical privilege and explores how the latter may be examined with particular reference to Aotearoa New Zealand. Three core elements of historical trauma are posited as a useful framework to apply to historical privilege. (Authors' abstract). Record #5686