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Domestic violence and family law : criminological concerns Molly Dragiewicz

By: Dragiewicz, Molly.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy.Publisher: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 2014Subject(s): ACCESS | CHILD CUSTODY | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | FAMILY COURT | FAMILY LAW | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | SEPARATION | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online In: International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 2014, 3(1): 121-134Summary: The battered women’s movement in the United States contributed to a sweeping change in the recognition of men’s violence against female intimate partners. Naming the problem and arguing in favor of its identification as a serious problem meriting a collective response were key aspects of this effort. Criminal and civil laws have been written and revised in an effort to answer calls to take such violence seriously. Scholars have devoted significant attention to the consequences of this reframing of violence, especially around the unintended outcomes of the incorporation of domestic violence into criminal justice regimes. Family law, however, has remained largely unexamined by criminologists. This paper calls for criminological attention to family law responses to domestic violence and provides directions for future research. (Author's abstract). Record #5766
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International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy, 2014, 3(1): 121-134

The battered women’s movement in the United States contributed to a sweeping change in the recognition of men’s violence against female intimate partners. Naming the problem and arguing in favor of its identification as a serious problem meriting a collective response were key aspects of this effort. Criminal and civil laws have been written and revised in an effort to answer calls to take such violence seriously. Scholars have devoted significant attention to the consequences of this reframing of violence, especially around the unintended outcomes of the incorporation of domestic violence into criminal justice regimes. Family law, however, has remained largely unexamined by criminologists. This paper calls for criminological attention to family law responses to domestic violence and provides directions for future research. (Author's abstract). Record #5766