Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Economic abuse in New Zealand : towards an understanding and response Sandra Milne, Susan Maury and Dr Pauline Gulliver, co-author, Nicola Eccleton

By: Milne, Sandra.
Contributor(s): Maury, Susan | Gulliver, Pauline | Eccleton, Nicola.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Abbotsford, Vic : Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand, 2018Description: electronic document (90 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): ABUSED WOMEN | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ECONOMIC ABUSE | FINANCIAL ABUSE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | LITERATURE REVIEWS | PREVALENCE | PREVENTION | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: Violence against women is an issue that every country is trying to address, and ultimately eliminate. Reportedly, one in three New Zealand women experiences physical and/or sexual violence from a partner, known as intimate partner violence (IPV), in their lifetime (Aviva). Approximately half of all homicides in New Zealand are family violence-related, and, per capita, this family violence homicide rate is more than twice that of Australia, Canada, or the United Kingdom. Economic insecurity is one of the key reasons many people do not feel they are able to leave violent relationships, and why some may return to violent partners. Economic insecurity is not only a consequence of family violence, but is itself a form of family violence (as economic or financial abuse)(Corrie, 2016). Economic abuse is a specific type of family violence that is “causing or attempting to cause an individual to become financially dependent on another person, by obstructing their access to or control over resources and/or independent economic activity (UN Women, 2012).” Economic abuse is often, but not always, part of a pattern of abusive control that incorporates other forms of intimate partner violence (IPV), including physical, sexual and psychological. However, awareness of economic abuse in New Zealand is quite low, and it has only recently been added to the legislative definition of family violence. This study considers economic abuse, specifically as a form of IPV where men perpetrate violence against women, within the New Zealand context. The purpose of this report is to contribute to a common understanding of economic abuse and grow the knowledge in this area to support effective, evidence-based policy and practice responses. (From the Executive summary). Record #5954
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON18080024

Commissioned by Good Shepherd New Zealand

Violence against women is an issue that every country is trying to address, and ultimately eliminate. Reportedly, one in three New Zealand women experiences physical and/or sexual violence from a partner, known as intimate partner violence (IPV), in their lifetime (Aviva). Approximately half of all homicides in New Zealand are family violence-related, and, per capita, this family violence homicide rate is more than twice that of Australia, Canada, or the United Kingdom. Economic insecurity is one of the key reasons many people do not feel they are able to leave violent relationships, and why some may return to violent partners. Economic insecurity is not only a consequence of family violence, but is itself a form of family violence (as economic or financial abuse)(Corrie, 2016).

Economic abuse is a specific type of family violence that is “causing or attempting to cause an individual to become financially dependent on another person, by obstructing their access to or control over resources and/or independent economic activity (UN Women, 2012).” Economic abuse is often, but not always, part of a pattern of abusive control that incorporates other forms of intimate partner violence (IPV), including physical, sexual and psychological. However, awareness of economic abuse in New Zealand is quite low, and it has only recently been added to the legislative definition of family violence. This study considers economic abuse, specifically as a form of IPV where men perpetrate violence against women, within the New Zealand context. The purpose of this report is to contribute to a common understanding of economic abuse and grow the knowledge in this area to support effective, evidence-based policy and practice responses. (From the Executive summary). Record #5954