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Recall and understanding of a communication campaign designed to promote positive parenting and prevent child maltreatment Marie-Hélène Gagné, Ariane Bélanger-Gravel, Marie-Ève Clément and Julie Poissant

By: Gagné, Marie-Hélène.
Contributor(s): Bélanger-Gravel, Ariane | Clément, Marie-Eve | Poissant, Julie.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Preventive Medicine Reports.Publisher: Elsevier, 2018Subject(s): CAMPAIGNS | CHILD ABUSE | EVALUATION | PARENTING | PARENTING PROGRAMMES | SOCIAL MARKETING | CANADAOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Preventive Medicine Reports, 2018, 12: 191-197Summary: Evidence-based parenting support programs are among effective strategies for preventing child maltreatment. The launch of mass media campaigns accompanying the implementation of such programs has been re-commended to optimize reach and parent enrollment. This paper focuses on a communication campaign developed to support the implementation of the Triple P - Positive Parenting Program in two French-Canadian communities. Proximal outcomes (recall and understanding) were assessed through a randomized telephone survey conducted between January and April 2017 among 1029 mothers of children aged 6 months to 8 years. Distribution and correlates of the respondents' recall and understanding of the campaign were examined. Results show that 32.1% of respondents recalled having seen the campaign material. Among these, a large majority reported having understood the intended messages (parenting difficulties are normal, seeking help is the right thing to do, and/or effective support is available). However, some respondents also retained unintended messages blaming parents and/or children, and almost half the sample retained mixed messages (intended and unintended). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that community of residence, annual household income, and psychological aggression towards the child at home were three significant correlates of campaign recall + intended messages understood. None of the examined factors were associated with recall + mixed messages understood. Findings suggest a neighborhood effect on the proximal outcomes of the campaign, and a slightly higher reach and understanding among better-off families as well as families struggling with psycho-logically violent parenting practices. These results are discussed in light of the outcomes of similar campaigns. (Authors' abstract). Record #6008
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Preventive Medicine Reports, 2018, 12: 191-197

Evidence-based parenting support programs are among effective strategies for preventing child maltreatment. The launch of mass media campaigns accompanying the implementation of such programs has been re-commended to optimize reach and parent enrollment. This paper focuses on a communication campaign developed to support the implementation of the Triple P - Positive Parenting Program in two French-Canadian communities. Proximal outcomes (recall and understanding) were assessed through a randomized telephone survey conducted between January and April 2017 among 1029 mothers of children aged 6 months to 8 years. Distribution and correlates of the respondents' recall and understanding of the campaign were examined. Results show that 32.1% of respondents recalled having seen the campaign material. Among these, a large majority reported having understood the intended messages (parenting difficulties are normal, seeking help is the right thing to do, and/or effective support is available). However, some respondents also retained unintended messages blaming parents and/or children, and almost half the sample retained mixed messages (intended and unintended). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that community of residence, annual household income, and psychological aggression towards the child at home were three significant correlates of campaign recall + intended messages understood. None of the examined factors were associated with recall + mixed messages understood. Findings suggest a neighborhood effect on the proximal outcomes of the campaign, and a slightly higher reach and understanding among better-off families as well as families struggling with psycho-logically violent parenting practices. These results are discussed in light of the outcomes of similar campaigns. (Authors' abstract). Record #6008