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Understanding elder abuse : a scoping study Melanie Joosten, Freda Vrantsidis and Briony Dow

By: Joosten, Melanie.
Contributor(s): Vrantsidis, Freda | Dow, Briony.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Melbourne, Vic : University of Melbourne; National Ageing Research Institute, 2017Description: electronic document (66 pages) ; PDF file.ISBN: 978 0 9942709 6 2.Subject(s): Melbourne Social Equity Institute, University of Melbourne | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ELDER ABUSE | FAMILY VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | LITERATURE REVIEWS | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: This review begins with a broad discussion of elder abuse by considering the definition of the term and the prevalence of the behaviour, the impact elder abuse has on older people and the wider population, and the family context within which elder abuse most often occurs. It then considers the different ways elder abuse is conceptualised, and how it intersects with a range of other issues including ageism, family violence and conflict, caregiving, gender and sexuality, and culture and suggests that an applied ecological approach (which considers the individual and their place within their community and society) is the most comprehensive way of conceptualising elder abuse. Finally, interventions that show some evidence or promise, and which should be further and more rigorously researched and evaluated are described. (From the Executive summary). Record #6063
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This review begins with a broad discussion of elder abuse by considering the definition of the term and the prevalence of the behaviour, the impact elder abuse has on older people and the wider population, and the family context within which elder abuse most often occurs. It then considers the different ways elder abuse is conceptualised, and how it intersects with a range of other issues including ageism, family violence and conflict, caregiving, gender and sexuality, and culture and suggests that an applied ecological approach (which considers the individual and their place within their community and society) is the most comprehensive way of conceptualising elder abuse. Finally, interventions that show some evidence or promise, and which should be further and more rigorously researched and evaluated are described. (From the Executive summary). Record #6063