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Three principles to improve outcomes for children and families Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University

Contributor(s): Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boston, MA : Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, 2017Description: electronic document (14 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): BRAIN DEVELOPMENT | CHILDREN | FAMILIES | INFANTS | PARENTING | PRIMARY PREVENTION | PROTECTIVE FACTORS | SOCIAL POLICY | UNITED STATESOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: Recent advances in the science of brain development offer us an unprecedented opportunity to solve some of society’s most challenging problems, from widening disparities in school achievement and economic productivity to costly health problems across the lifespan. Understanding how the experiences children have starting at birth, even prenatally, affect lifelong outcomes—combined with new knowledge about the core capabilities adults need to thrive as parents and in the workplace—provides a strong foundation upon which policymakers and civic leaders can design a shared and more effective agenda. The science of child development and the core capabilities of adults point to a set of “design principles” that policymakers and practitioners in many different sectors can use to improve outcomes for children and families. That is, to be maximally effective, policies and services should: 1. Support responsive relationships for children and adults. 2. Strengthen core life skills. 3. Reduce sources of stress in the lives of children and families. (From the document). Record 6074
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Recent advances in the science of brain development offer us an unprecedented opportunity to solve some of society’s most challenging problems, from widening disparities in school achievement and economic productivity to costly health problems across the
lifespan. Understanding how the experiences children have starting at birth, even prenatally,
affect lifelong outcomes—combined with new knowledge about the core capabilities adults need to thrive as parents and in the workplace—provides a strong foundation upon which
policymakers and civic leaders can design a shared and more effective agenda.
The science of child development and the core capabilities of adults point to a set of “design
principles” that policymakers and practitioners in many different sectors can use to improve outcomes for children and families. That is, to be maximally effective, policies and services should:

1. Support responsive relationships for children and adults.

2. Strengthen core life skills.

3. Reduce sources of stress in the lives of children and families.
(From the document). Record 6074