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"It's an invisible wound" : the disenfranchised grief of post-separation mothers who lose care time Vivienne Elizabeth

By: Elizabeth, Vivienne.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law.Publisher: Taylor & Francis, 2018Subject(s): CHID CUSTODY | CHILD WELFARE | EMOTIONS | FAMILY LAW | MOTHERS | SEPARATION | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Read abstract In: Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 2018, Advance online publication, 3 December 2018Summary: This paper enriches understandings of the implications of contemporary custody law for mothers and their children. It does so through a discussion of mothers’ grief and emotional pain over involuntarily losing care time with children. Mothers involuntarily lose care time by becoming non-resident parents against their will or by having a shared care parenting order imposed on them. Both experiences of losing maternal care time are becoming more commonplace as a result of the gender neutrality of custody laws across the Anglo-West and the increased emphasis given to shared care parenting as a viable post-separation parenting arrangement. Yet investigations into the emotions engendered by mothers’ loss of care time are sparse. Exploratory qualitative research with twelve mothers who involuntarily lost care time reveals the intensity and durability of their grief, its entanglement with emotions like fear, and its significance, as a relational welfare approach emphasises, to children’s best interests. (Author's abstract). Record #6132
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Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 2018, Advance online publication, 3 December 2018

This paper enriches understandings of the implications of contemporary custody law for mothers and their children. It does so through a discussion of mothers’ grief and emotional pain over involuntarily losing care time with children. Mothers involuntarily lose care time by becoming non-resident parents against their will or by having a shared care parenting order imposed on them. Both experiences of losing maternal care time are becoming more commonplace as a result of the gender neutrality of custody laws across the Anglo-West and the increased emphasis given to shared care parenting as a viable post-separation parenting arrangement. Yet investigations into the emotions engendered by mothers’ loss of care time are sparse. Exploratory qualitative research with twelve mothers who involuntarily lost care time reveals the intensity and durability of their grief, its entanglement with emotions like fear, and its significance, as a relational welfare approach emphasises, to children’s best interests. (Author's abstract). Record #6132