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Dreams deferred : a survey on the impact of intimate partner violence on survivors' education, careers and economic security Cynthia Hess and Alona Del Rosario

By: Hess, Cynthia.
Contributor(s): Del Rosario, Alona.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Washington, DC : Institute for Women's Policy Research, 2018Description: electronic document (53 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): ABUSED WOMEN | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ECONOMIC ASPECTS | EDUCATION | EMPLOYMENT | FINANCIAL ABUSE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | SEXUAL HARASSMENT | SURVEYS | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | WORKPLACEOnline resources: Click here to access online | Summary Summary: This report examines the educational, economic, and employment effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on survivors and the resource needs IPV creates. Drawing on a survey of 164 survivors in shelters, transitional housing programs, and other domestic violence programs in 11 states and the District of Columbia (in the United States), the report considers how survivors experience the economic consequences of abuse, the tactics their abusers use to foster economic dependence and insecurity, and the forms of assistance they need and find most helpful in addressing the financial impact of IPV. The report is a part of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s Economic Security for Survivors Project, which is designed to build, protect, and restore the economic security of survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and stalking. The report and project were funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (From the report). Record #6162
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This report examines the educational, economic, and employment effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on survivors and the resource needs IPV creates. Drawing on a survey of 164 survivors in shelters, transitional housing programs, and other domestic violence programs in 11 states and the District of Columbia (in the United States), the report considers how survivors experience the economic consequences of abuse, the tactics their abusers use to foster economic dependence and insecurity, and the forms of assistance they need and find most helpful in addressing the financial impact of IPV. The report is a part of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s Economic Security for Survivors Project, which is designed to build, protect, and restore the economic security of survivors of intimate partner violence, sexual violence, and stalking. The report and project were funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. (From the report). Record #6162