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Thinking differently in order to see accurately : explaining why we are convicting women we might otherwise be burying. Professor Julia Tolmie Inaugural Lecture, June 2019 Julia Tolmie

By: Tolmie, Julia.
Material type: materialTypeLabelVisual materialPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : University of Auckland, 2019Description: video recording (49.22 minutes) ; online.Subject(s): CRIMINAL JUSTICE | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | WOMEN'S USE OF VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: It has been suggested that legal professionals/expert witnesses frequently use outdated and inaccurate understandings of intimate partner violence when presenting facts at trial and applying the law to those facts. In this lecture, Professor Julia Tolmie will argue that, as a result, defendants who have committed offences in response to their intimate partner violence victimisation may be automatically precluded from accessing the criminal defences that should be available to them. She will use the facts of a particular homicide case to make this point.** The title is a misquote of Professor Elizabeth Sheehy, Defending Battered Women on Trial: Lessons from the Transcripts, UBC Press, 2014, 241. Please note: The information contained in the case could be emotionally disturbing to some viewers. Professor Tolmie delivered her inaugural lecture at the University of Auckland on 6 June 2019. The lecture was videoed and is available to view from the University of Auckland website. Record #6311
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It has been suggested that legal professionals/expert witnesses frequently use outdated and inaccurate understandings of intimate partner violence when presenting facts at trial and applying the law to those facts. In this lecture, Professor Julia Tolmie will argue that, as a result, defendants who have committed offences in response to their intimate partner violence victimisation may be automatically precluded from accessing the criminal defences that should be available to them. She will use the facts of a particular homicide case to make this point.**

The title is a misquote of Professor Elizabeth Sheehy, Defending Battered Women on Trial: Lessons from the Transcripts, UBC Press, 2014, 241.

Please note: The information contained in the case could be emotionally disturbing to some viewers.

Professor Tolmie delivered her inaugural lecture at the University of Auckland on 6 June 2019. The lecture was videoed and is available to view from the University of Auckland website. Record #6311