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Te Korowai Ture ā-Whānau : The final report of the Independent Panel examining the 2014 family justice reforms Independent Panel (Rosslyn Noonan, Chairperson)

Contributor(s): Noonan, Rosslyn [Chairperson] | Independent Panel examining the 2014 family justice reforms.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Ministry of Justice, 2019Description: electronic document (142 pages) ; PDF file : 1.3 MB ; DOCX file : 11 MB.ISBN: 978-0-478-32479-2.Subject(s): ACCESS | CHILD CUSTODY | CHILD WELFARE | CHILDREN | CHILDREN'S RIGHTS | FAMILIES | FAMILY COURT | FAMILY DISPUTE RESOLUTION | FAMILY LAW | JUSTICE | LAW REFORM | MĀORI | ORGANISATIONAL SYSTEMS | SEPARATION | TAITAMARIKI | TAMARIKI | TURE WHĀNAU | WHĀNAU | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website | Media release, 16 June 2019 Summary: In August 2018, the Minister of Justice, Hon Andrew Little announced the establishment of an independent panel to examine the 2014 family justice system reforms. The Panel was asked to consider: • the effectiveness of out of court services, such as Family Dispute Resolution (FDR); • the effectiveness of Family Court processes, particularly given the significant increase in the number of urgent (without notice) applications coming to the Court; • the roles of the professionals, for example, lawyers, lawyer for child, Family Dispute Resolution providers and psychologists; • whether the system as a whole is producing outcomes that are upholding the welfare and best interests of children, and particularly tamariki Māori. The Panel's principal recommendation is the proposal to introduce a joined-up family justice service, Te Korowai Ture ā-Whānau, bringing together the siloed and fragmented elements of the current in and out of court family justice services. The Korowai provides a variety of ways for people to access the right family justice service at the right time for them. The Korowai symbolises the mana of the family justice service; it affirms that all who draw on it for protection, support and empowerment will be treated with dignity and respect. Te Korowai Ture ā-Whānau will be child and whānau centred, timely, safe, responsive and accessible. It will provide for diversity; understand the impact of family violence; and will be cohesive, collaborative and cost effective Following the introduction, this report is divided into four parts. Part One discusses issues that flow through all family justice services. Part Two covers encouraging early agreement, while Part Three focusses on strengthening Family Court processes. Part Four contains recommendations on monitoring and development. These four parts outline what is required to enable Te Korowai Ture ā-Whānau to protect, support and empower children and their whānau, whatever their heritage and circumstances. They canvas what is required for children and their whānau to be listened to, heard and treated with dignity and respect. (From the Executive summary). Access the website for the Executive summary in te reo Māori, Easy read style and as a video in New Zealand Sign Language. The background to the 2014 family law reform, submissions to the Independent Panel and other information is available on the website. See also a research report commissioned from UMR Research, which summarises qualitative interviews UMR conducted with children, Māori and Pasifika parents and whānau, and disabled parents (#6317). Record #6316
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May 2019. Released 16 June 2019.

In August 2018, the Minister of Justice, Hon Andrew Little announced the establishment of an independent panel to examine the 2014 family justice system reforms.

The Panel was asked to consider:
• the effectiveness of out of court services, such as Family Dispute Resolution (FDR);
• the effectiveness of Family Court processes, particularly given the significant increase in the number of urgent (without notice) applications coming to the Court;
• the roles of the professionals, for example, lawyers, lawyer for child, Family Dispute Resolution providers and psychologists;
• whether the system as a whole is producing outcomes that are upholding the welfare and best interests of children, and particularly tamariki Māori.

The Panel's principal recommendation is the proposal to introduce a joined-up family justice service, Te Korowai Ture ā-Whānau, bringing together the siloed and fragmented elements of the current in and out of court family justice services. The Korowai provides a variety of ways for people to access the right family justice service at the right time for them.

The Korowai symbolises the mana of the family justice service; it affirms that all who draw on it for protection, support and empowerment will be treated with dignity and respect.

Te Korowai Ture ā-Whānau will be child and whānau centred, timely, safe, responsive and accessible. It will provide for diversity; understand the impact of family violence; and will be
cohesive, collaborative and cost effective

Following the introduction, this report is divided into four parts. Part One discusses issues that flow through all family justice services. Part Two covers encouraging early agreement, while Part Three focusses on strengthening Family Court processes. Part Four contains recommendations on monitoring and development. These four parts outline what is required to enable Te Korowai Ture ā-Whānau to protect, support and empower children and their whānau, whatever their heritage and circumstances. They canvas what is required for children and their whānau to be listened to, heard and treated with dignity and respect. (From the Executive summary).

Access the website for the Executive summary in te reo Māori, Easy read style and as a video in New Zealand Sign Language. The background to the 2014 family law reform, submissions to the Independent Panel and other information is available on the website. See also a research report commissioned from UMR Research, which summarises qualitative interviews UMR conducted with children, Māori and Pasifika parents and whānau, and disabled parents (#6317).
Record #6316