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Beliefs and recommendations regarding child custody and visitation in cases involving domestic violence : a comparison of professionals in different roles Daniel G. Saunders, Kathleen C. Faller and Richard M. Tolman

By: Saunders, Daniel G.
Contributor(s): Faller, Kathleen C | Tolman, Richard M.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Violence Against Women.Publisher: Sage, 2016Subject(s): ACCESS | ATTITUDES | CHILD CUSTODY | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | FAMILY COURT | FAMILY LAW | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | SEPARATION | UNITED STATESOnline resources: Read abstract In: Violence Against Women, 2016, 22(6): 722–744Summary: Research is lacking on differing perspectives regarding custody cases involving domestic violence (DV). In a survey of judges, legal aid attorneys, private attorneys, DV program workers, and child custody evaluators (n = 1,187), judges, private attorneys, and evaluators were more likely to believe that mothers make false DV allegations and alienate their children. In response to a vignette, evaluators and private attorneys were most likely to recommend joint custody and least likely to recommend sole custody to the survivor. Legal aid attorneys and DV workers were similar on many variables. Gender, DV knowledge, and knowing victims explained many group differences. (Authors' abstract). Record #6360
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Violence Against Women, 2016, 22(6): 722–744

Research is lacking on differing perspectives regarding custody cases involving domestic violence (DV). In a survey of judges, legal aid attorneys, private attorneys, DV program workers, and child custody evaluators (n = 1,187), judges, private attorneys, and evaluators were more likely to believe that mothers make false DV allegations and alienate their children. In response to a vignette, evaluators and private attorneys were most likely to recommend joint custody and least likely to recommend sole custody to the survivor. Legal aid attorneys and DV workers were similar on many variables. Gender, DV knowledge, and knowing victims explained many group differences. (Authors' abstract). Record #6360