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Victims' voices : the justice needs and experiences of New Zealand serious crime victims Petrina Hargrave

By: Hargrave, Petrina.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Victim Support New Zealand, 2019Description: electronic document (44 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): Hāpaitia te Oranga Tangata Safe and Effective Justice | Victim Support New Zealand | CRIMINAL JUSTICE | FAMILY VIOLENCE | JUSTICE | RESTORATIVE JUSTICE | SENTENCING | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | VICTIMS OF CRIMES | VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | VICTIMS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Media release Summary: In order to ensure victims' voices were heard in the justice reforms, Victim Support conducted in depth interviews with 32 victims of serious crime and explored their experience of procedural justice and what justice meant to them. In the study, 68% of victims felt that justice had not been served in their case, despite 86% of cases resulting in a guilty verdict and 52% in imprisonment of the offender. Victims' definitions of justice were more a set of values (e.g., righting the wrong, fairness, and accountability) rather than an outcome, but these values are largely absent from the current system. Victims commonly felt their involvement in the justice system was tokenism, and that they didn't genuinely matter. Victim Support is calling for a shift in the culture of the justice system, from one that simply ticks boxes to one where victims and their needs are the foundation of any changes to the system. This research complements the recent findings of Chief Victims' Advisor Dr Kim McGregor (#6365), who is considering the findings from this report in her recommendations to the Government for improving the justice system for victims. (From the author). Record #6367
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In order to ensure victims' voices were heard in the justice reforms, Victim Support conducted in depth interviews with 32 victims of serious crime and explored their experience of procedural justice and what justice meant to them. In the study, 68% of victims felt that justice had not been served in their case, despite 86% of cases resulting in a guilty verdict and 52% in imprisonment of the offender.

Victims' definitions of justice were more a set of values (e.g., righting the wrong, fairness, and accountability) rather than an outcome, but these values are largely absent from the current system. Victims commonly felt their involvement in the justice system was tokenism, and that they didn't genuinely matter. Victim Support is calling for a shift in the culture of the justice system, from one that simply ticks boxes to one where victims and their needs are the foundation of any changes to the system.

This research complements the recent findings of Chief Victims' Advisor Dr Kim McGregor (#6365), who is considering the findings from this report in her recommendations to the Government for improving the justice system for victims. (From the author). Record #6367

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