Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Thinking differently : re-framing family violence responsiveness in the mental health and addictions health care context Jacqueline Short, Fiona Cram, Michael Roguski, Rachel Smith and Jane Koziol-McLain

By: Short, Jacqueline.
Contributor(s): Cram, Fiona | Roguski, Michael | Smithies, Rachel | Koziol-McLain, Jane.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing.Publisher: Wiley, 2019Subject(s): New Zealand. Family Violence Death Review Committee | He tao huata e taea te karo | ADDICTION | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | FAMILIES | FAMILY VIOLENCE | HEALTH | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | MĀORI | MENTAL HEALTH | RACISM | HAUORA | HAUORA HINENGARO | KAHUNGATANGA | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TŪKINOTANGA Ā-WHĀNAU | WHAKAHĀWEA IWI | WHĀNAU | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Media release In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 2019, Advance online publicationSummary: Aotearoa New Zealand’s high rate s of intimate partner violence (IPV) and child abuse and neglect point to a clear need to develop and resource equitable mental health and addiction practices that are responsive both to people experiencing and using violence, and to their families. Current responses to IPV in mental health and addiction settings in Aotearoa New Zealand require a critical re-framing, from an individualistic autonomy and empowerment framework that constrains practitioners’ practice, to an understanding IPV as a form of social entrapment. Using a composite story constructed from 28 in-depth New Zealand family violence death reviews, we highlight current problematic practice and discuss alternative responses that could create safer lives for people and families. Re-framing IPV as a form of social entrapment acknowledges it as a complex social problem that requires collective steps to secure people’s safety and well-being. Importantly, a social entrapment framework encompasses interpersonal and structural forms of violence, such as the historical and intergenerational trauma of colonization and links to ongoing structural inequities for Maori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa) in Aotearoa New Zealand. (Authors' abstract). Record #6368
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Access online Access online Online Available ON19090001

International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 2019, Advance online publication

Aotearoa New Zealand’s high rate s of intimate partner violence (IPV) and child abuse and neglect point to a clear need to develop and resource equitable mental health and addiction practices that are responsive both to people experiencing and using violence, and to
their families. Current responses to IPV in mental health and addiction settings in Aotearoa New Zealand require a critical re-framing, from an individualistic autonomy and empowerment
framework that constrains practitioners’ practice, to an understanding IPV as a form of social entrapment. Using a composite story constructed from 28 in-depth New Zealand family violence
death reviews, we highlight current problematic practice and discuss alternative responses that could create safer lives for people and families. Re-framing IPV as a form of social entrapment acknowledges it as a complex social problem that requires collective steps to secure people’s safety and well-being. Importantly, a social entrapment framework encompasses interpersonal and
structural forms of violence, such as the historical and intergenerational trauma of colonization and links to ongoing structural inequities for Maori (the indigenous people of Aotearoa) in Aotearoa New Zealand. (Authors' abstract). Record #6368