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To report or not to report? : That is the question Katherine Hall, Emma Donaldson and Martyn Williamson

By: Hall, Katherine.
Contributor(s): Donaldson, Emma | Williamson, Martyn.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Journal of Primary Health Care.Publisher: CSIRO, 2017Subject(s): ADOLESCENT RELATIONSHIP ABUSE | ADOLESCENTS | CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE | CONSENT | DISCLOSURE | ETHICS | MEDICAL PROFESSION | REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | YOUNG MEN | YOUNG WOMEN | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Journal of Primary Health Care, 2017, 9(4):244–247Summary: In New Zealand general practices, we come across adolescents who are sexually active. It is quite clear in New Zealand law that everyone (including minors) who has sexual connection with a young person below the age of 16 years is potentially liable for prosecution and imprisonment. In the UK, there is mandatory reporting of all sexually active children aged 13 years or less.3,4 Many people feel that every instance of under-age intercourse should be reported to the police; however, mandatory reporting can be counter-productive. (From the introduction). This article discusses the ethical issues for general practitioners using the case study involving a young woman. Record #6379
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Journal of Primary Health Care, 2017, 9(4):244–247

In New Zealand general practices, we come across adolescents who are sexually active. It is quite clear in New Zealand law that everyone (including minors) who has sexual connection with a young person below the age of 16 years is potentially liable for prosecution and imprisonment. In the UK, there is mandatory reporting of all sexually active children aged 13 years or less.3,4 Many people feel that every instance of under-age intercourse should be reported to the police; however, mandatory reporting can be counter-productive. (From the introduction). This article discusses the ethical issues for general practitioners using the case study involving a young woman. Record #6379