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Domestic violence offenders, prior offending and reoffending in Australia Shann Hulme, Anthony Morgan and Hayley Boxall

By: Hulme, Shann.
Contributor(s): Morgan, Anthony | Boxall, Hayley.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice.Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian Institute of Criminology, 2019Description: electronic document (16 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): ABORIGINAL & TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER PEOPLES | ALCOHOL-RELATED HARM | CRIME | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | OFFENDERS | PERPETRATORS | PERPETRATORS | RECIDIVISM | AUSTRALIAOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, no. 580, September 2019Summary: Developing effective strategies to reduce domestic violence offending requires an understanding of perpetrator characteristics, offending patterns and recidivism. This study consolidates the Australian evidence base through a systematic review of 39 quantitative studies that examined domestic violence offending and reoffending. Despite the wide range of data sources, samples and measures of violence, findings are remarkably consistent across studies. The findings further reinforce the importance of targeting male perpetrated violence, and reducing violence in Indigenous communities. Alcohol featured in a significant proportion of domestic violence incidents. Finally, the study demonstrates the importance of reducing repeat offending, particularly among prolific offenders, to reduce overall rates of violence. (Authors' abstract). Record #6448
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Trends & Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, no. 580, September 2019

Developing effective strategies to reduce domestic violence offending requires an understanding of perpetrator characteristics, offending patterns and recidivism.

This study consolidates the Australian evidence base through a systematic review of 39 quantitative studies that examined domestic violence offending and reoffending. Despite the wide range of data sources, samples and measures of violence, findings are remarkably consistent across studies.

The findings further reinforce the importance of targeting male perpetrated violence, and reducing violence in Indigenous communities. Alcohol featured in a significant proportion of domestic violence incidents. Finally, the study demonstrates the importance of reducing repeat offending, particularly among prolific offenders, to reduce overall rates of violence. (Authors' abstract). Record #6448