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LGBTQI experiences of seeking help and justice in the wake of sexual harm David L. Hare

By: Hare, David L.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Women's Studies Journal.Publisher: Women's Studies Association Aotearoa New Zealand, 2019Subject(s): ATTITUDES | JUSTICE | LGBTIQ | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | VICTIMS OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Women's Studies Journal, 2019, 33(1/2): 25-32Summary: Within Aotearoa/New Zealand’s justice system and help-providing professions, little is known or understood about LGBTQI experiences of sexual harm. In this research report, which is based on research I conducted as part of my Masters of Public Policy, I demonstrate that institutional and legal frameworks, as well as wider societal understandings of sexual violence, create intersecting barriers to help-seeking and justice for LGBTQI people who have experienced sexual harm. These discriminating factors are found to be symptomatic of a wider societal heteronormative discourse, which further delegitimises traumatised LGBTQI victims of sexual harm. Subsequently, LGBTQI people rarely attempt to seek help or justice in the aftermath of their assault. This report identifies three challenging issues facing the LGBTQI community in Aotearoa/New Zealand regarding their experiences of sexual harm, and argues that policy makers seeking to address these issues need to adopt a more holistic approach that considers wider socio-cultural discourses of gender, sexuality, and sexual violence. (Author's abstract). Record #6469
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Women's Studies Journal, 2019, 33(1/2): 25-32

Within Aotearoa/New Zealand’s justice system and help-providing professions, little is known or understood
about LGBTQI experiences of sexual harm. In this research report, which is based on research I conducted as
part of my Masters of Public Policy, I demonstrate that institutional and legal frameworks, as well as wider
societal understandings of sexual violence, create intersecting barriers to help-seeking and justice for LGBTQI
people who have experienced sexual harm. These discriminating factors are found to be symptomatic of a wider
societal heteronormative discourse, which further delegitimises traumatised LGBTQI victims of sexual harm.
Subsequently, LGBTQI people rarely attempt to seek help or justice in the aftermath of their assault. This report
identifies three challenging issues facing the LGBTQI community in Aotearoa/New Zealand regarding their
experiences of sexual harm, and argues that policy makers seeking to address these issues need to adopt a more
holistic approach that considers wider socio-cultural discourses of gender, sexuality, and sexual violence. (Author's abstract). Record #6469