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Making disability rights real | Whakatūturu ngā tika hauātanga : third report of the Independent Monitoring Mechanism of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Aotearoa | New Zealand 2014–2019 Chief Ombudsman, Office of the Ombudsman, Chair, Disabled People's Organisations' (DPO) Coalition and Disability Rights Commissioner, New Zealand Human Rights Commission

Contributor(s): Office of the Ombudsman | Disabled People's Organisations' (DPO) Coalition | Human Rights Commission | Te Kāhuii Tika Tangata.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Wellington, New Zealand : Office of the Ombudsman, 2020Description: electronic document (216 pages) ; PDF file and other formats.ISBN: 978-0-473-52500-2 (PDF).Subject(s): CHILDREN | Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) | DISABLED PEOPLE | HUMAN RIGHTS | MĀORI | PACIFIC PEOPLES | PASIFIKA | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | WOMEN | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access other formats | Media release Summary: New Zealand has a mixed record when it comes to the rights of disabled people. Although we do some things well, there is still a great deal of work required to remove barriers stopping disabled people from participating in society on an equal basis. The IMM have identified six key themes that must be prioritised to ensure the realisation of the fundamental rights set out in the Disability Convention in New Zealand. It is also important that we highlight the experience of disabled Māori and Pacific peoples in our report. We have ranked the six key themes in order to make clear where the most urgent action is needed by the Government. The IMM believes that education, housing and seclusion and restraint are the most pressing issues for disabled people that the Government must take urgent action on. Other recommendations include those relating to Māori, Pacific peoples, equality and non-discrimination, women with disabilities, children with disabilities and freedom from exploitation, violence and abuse. Article 33 of the Disability Convention requires governments to establish an independent mechanism to promote, protect and monitor its implementation. The structure of New Zealand’s IMM reflects the partnership approach underpinning the Disability Convention. The IMM partners are the Disabled People’s Organisations’ (DPO) Coalition (a body reflecting the voice of disabled people in the monitoring process), the Ombudsman, and the Human Rights Commission. (From the document). Record #6734
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Published June 2020

New Zealand has a mixed record when it comes to the rights of disabled people. Although we do some things well, there is still a great deal of work required to remove barriers stopping disabled people from participating in society on an equal basis. The IMM have identified six key themes that must be prioritised to ensure the realisation of the fundamental rights set out in the Disability Convention in New Zealand. It is also important that we highlight the experience of disabled Māori and Pacific peoples in our report. We have ranked the six key themes in order to make clear where the most urgent action is needed by the Government.

The IMM believes that education, housing and seclusion and restraint are the most pressing issues for disabled people that the Government must take urgent action on.

Other recommendations include those relating to Māori, Pacific peoples, equality and non-discrimination, women with disabilities, children with disabilities and freedom from exploitation, violence and abuse.

Article 33 of the Disability Convention requires governments to establish an independent mechanism to promote, protect and monitor its implementation. The structure of New Zealand’s IMM reflects the partnership approach underpinning the
Disability Convention. The IMM partners are the Disabled People’s Organisations’ (DPO) Coalition (a body reflecting the voice of disabled people in the monitoring process), the Ombudsman, and the Human Rights Commission. (From the document). Record #6734

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