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Shifting the line : boys talk on gender, sexism and online ethics Nicola Gavey, Octavia Calder-Dawe, Kris Taylor, Jade Le Grice, Brandee Thorburn, Sam Manuela, Makarena Dudley, Senuri Panditharatne, Riane Ross and Angela Carr

By: Gavey, Nicola.
Contributor(s): Calder-Dawe, Octavia | Taylor, Kris | Le Grice, Jade | Thorburn, Brandee | Manuela, Sam | Dudley, Makarena | Panditharatne, Senuri | Ross, Riane | Carr, Angela.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : School of Psychology, University of Auckland, 2021Description: electronic document (156 pages) ; PDF file.ISBN: 0-473–51738-0 (PDF).Subject(s): ADOLESCENTS | ATTITUDES | BEHAVIOUR CHANGE | IMAGE-BASED SEXUAL ABUSE | MASCULINITY | SEXUAL HARASSMENT | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | SOCIAL CHANGE | TECHNOLOGY-FACILITATED ABUSE | YOUNG MEN | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online | Access the website | Read NZFVC news Summary: In Aotearoa New Zealand, as in other parts of the world, we too often hear about the latest instalment of ‘toxic masculinity’ to make the headlines – cases of boys and men acting with a sense of dominance and entitlement, treating women as objects that exist purely for their pleasure or amusement.1 Globally, the spotlight has increasingly turned to the role of men and boys in countering this kind of sexism, sexual violence and harassment against women and girls, both off and online. We conducted research to explore a way of working with secondary school age boys and young men to support and facilitate their contribution to positive change away from a culture that tolerates online sexual harassment and sexualised abuse. Our work with boys focussed on online communication between boys and girls, which we framed within a broader context of gender equality and ethics. We worked with boys who were interested in thinking about these issues and helping provide insights into how boys can promote positive change in their own peer circles in relation to equality. Through workshops, we explored ways of supporting and building on these young men’s willingness to recognise sexism and interrupt harmful gendered norms and behaviours. This report presents our sociocultural approach to making sense of the persistent problem of online sexual harassment and sexualised abuse, our ‘theory of change’ and the nuts and bolts of how we translated this into a model for working with boys that facilitates their readiness to support positive social change. It also discusses key findings from testing this model in workshops with over 50 boys and young men in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. The boys who participated in the project contributed as cultural informants, commentators, and sometimes critics. They offered observations and perspectives that provide a window into understanding the gendered sociocul-tural context that local young men grow up in. Their insights clarify some of the ways this context limits boys at the same time as it holds gender inequality in place. On an encouraging note, the boys’ overall responses to the workshops suggested that by creating spaces for open, challenging and respectful conversations about these issues, there is the potential to ignite and support change. (From the Executive summary). Record #7234
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In Aotearoa New Zealand, as in other parts of the world, we too often hear about the latest instalment of ‘toxic masculinity’ to make the headlines – cases of boys and men acting with a sense of dominance and entitlement, treating women as objects that exist purely for their pleasure or amusement.1 Globally, the spotlight has increasingly turned to the role of men and boys in countering this kind of sexism, sexual violence and harassment against women and girls, both off and online. We conducted research to explore a way of working with secondary school age boys and young men to support and facilitate their contribution to positive change away from a culture that tolerates online sexual harassment and sexualised abuse. Our work with boys focussed on online communication between boys and girls, which we framed within a broader context of gender equality and ethics. We worked with boys who were interested in thinking about these issues and helping provide insights into how boys can promote positive change in their own peer circles in relation to equality. Through workshops, we explored ways of supporting and building on these young men’s willingness to recognise sexism and interrupt harmful gendered norms and behaviours. This report presents our sociocultural approach to making sense of the persistent problem of online sexual harassment and sexualised abuse, our ‘theory of change’ and the nuts and bolts of how we translated this into a model for working with boys that facilitates their readiness to support positive social change. It also discusses key findings from testing this model in workshops with over 50 boys and young men in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. The boys who participated in the project contributed as cultural informants, commentators, and sometimes critics. They offered observations and perspectives that provide a window into understanding the gendered sociocul-tural context that local young men grow up in. Their insights clarify some of the ways this context limits boys at the same time as it holds gender inequality in place. On an encouraging note, the boys’ overall responses to the workshops suggested that by creating spaces for open, challenging and respectful conversations about these issues, there is the potential to ignite and support change. (From the Executive summary). Record #7234

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