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Prevalence of nonpartner physical and sexual violence against people with disabilities Zarintaj A. Malihi, Janet L. Fanslow, Ladan Hashemi, Pauline J. Gulliver and Tracey K.D. McIntosh

By: Malihi, Zarintaj.
Contributor(s): Fanslow, Janet L | Hashemi, Ladan | Gulliver, Pauline | McIntosh, Tracey.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Publisher: AJPM, 2021Subject(s): ABUSED MEN | ABUSED WOMEN | DISABLED PEOPLE | PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES | PERPETRATORS | PHYSICAL ABUSE | PREVALENCE | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | 2019 NZ FAMILY VIOLENCE STUDY | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2021.03.016 (Open access) | Read media release, 22 July 2021 In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2021, Advance online publication, 21 July 2021Summary: Introduction: This study aims to determine the prevalence rates of nonpartner physical and sexual violence in men and women with different disabilities compared with those in people without disabilities. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were conducted in 3 regions of New Zealand (2017–2019), and 2,887 randomly selected respondents participated (1,464 women, 1,423 men). Respondents provided information on the disability types (physical, intellectual, psychological, none) experienced and on the experience of physical and sexual violence since age 15 years. Analysis was conducted in 2020–2021. Results: More people with disabilities reported nonpartner physical and sexual violence experience than those without disabilities. For women, 15.4% of those with disabilities experienced lifetime nonpartner physical violence, and 11.1% experienced lifetime nonpartner sexual violence. For men with disabilities, 56.2% experienced lifetime nonpartner physical violence, and 5.6% experienced lifetime nonpartner sexual violence. Women and men with psychological disabilities reported the highest prevalence rates of nonpartner physical and sexual violence. The main perpetrators of nonpartner physical violence for women with disabilities were parents and relatives (59.7%), whereas for men with disabilities, strangers (59.3%) were the main perpetrators. Among people with disabilities who reported nonpartner sexual violence, 43.5% of women and 60.0% of men never sought help. Conclusions: This is one of the few studies globally reporting on the prevalence of nonpartner violence in both men and women with different disability types. It contributes information on the gender and relationships of those who perpetrated the violence. Findings highlight the need for violence prevention and intervention programs that are inclusive of and responsive to those with different disability types. (Authors' abstract). Record #7243
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American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2021, Advance online publication, 21 July 2021

Introduction: This study aims to determine the prevalence rates of nonpartner physical and sexual violence in men and women with different disabilities compared with those in people without disabilities.

Methods: Face-to-face interviews were conducted in 3 regions of New Zealand (2017–2019), and 2,887 randomly selected respondents participated (1,464 women, 1,423 men). Respondents provided information on the disability types (physical, intellectual, psychological, none) experienced and on the experience of physical and sexual violence since age 15 years. Analysis was conducted in 2020–2021.

Results: More people with disabilities reported nonpartner physical and sexual violence experience than those without disabilities. For women, 15.4% of those with disabilities experienced lifetime nonpartner physical violence, and 11.1% experienced lifetime nonpartner sexual violence. For men with disabilities, 56.2% experienced lifetime nonpartner physical violence, and 5.6% experienced lifetime nonpartner sexual violence. Women and men with psychological disabilities reported the highest prevalence rates of nonpartner physical and sexual violence. The main perpetrators of nonpartner physical violence for women with disabilities were parents and relatives (59.7%), whereas for men with disabilities, strangers (59.3%) were the main perpetrators. Among people with disabilities who reported nonpartner sexual violence, 43.5% of women and 60.0% of men never sought help.

Conclusions: This is one of the few studies globally reporting on the prevalence of nonpartner violence in both men and women with different disability types. It contributes information on the gender and relationships of those who perpetrated the violence. Findings highlight the need for violence prevention and intervention programs that are inclusive of and responsive to those with different disability types. (Authors' abstract). Record #7243