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Lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence and disability : Janet L. Fanslow, Zarintaj A. Malihi, Ladan Hashemi, Pauline J. Gulliver and Tracey K.D. McIntosh results from a population-based study in New Zealand

By: Fanslow, Janet L.
Contributor(s): Malihi, Zarintaj | Hashemi, Ladan | Gulliver, Pauline | McIntosh, Tracey.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: American Journal of Preventive Medicine.Publisher: AJPM, 2021Subject(s): ABUSED MEN | ABUSED WOMEN | COERCIVE CONTROL | DISABLED PEOPLE | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | ECONOMIC ABUSE | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | PEOPLE WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES | PHYSICAL ABUSE | PREVALENCE | PSYCHOLOGICAL ABUSE | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | 2019 NZ FAMILY VIOLENCE STUDY | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2021.02.022 (Open access) | Read media release, 22 July 2021 In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2021, Advance online publication, 21 July 2021Summary: Introduction: There is no population-based study on prevalence rates for all forms of intimate partner violence experienced by people with different types of disabilities in New Zealand. This study compares the reported lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence (physical, sexual, psychological, controlling behaviors, and economic abuse) for people with different types of disabilities with that reported by those without disabilities and tests whether there is a gender difference. Methods: From March 2017 to March 2019, a total of 2,888 women and men aged ≥16 years participated in a cross-sectional study in New Zealand using a cluster random sampling method. Face-to-face interviews were used for data collection. The WHO Multi-country Study questionnaire was employed as the data collection tool. Logistic regression was conducted, and AORs were reported. Results: Those with any disability reported significantly higher rates of most forms of intimate partner violence than those without disabilities, among both genders, including physical intimate partner violence (AOR=1.80, 95% CI=1.32, 2.47 for women, AOR=2.44, 95% CI=1.72, 3.45 for men) and psychological and economic abuse. Women with disabilities were more likely to report experiences of sexual intimate partner violence than men (range =13.5-17.1% vs 4.0%–21.2% in men). Men with intellectual disability were more likely to report physical intimate partner violence than women with intellectual disability (60.5% in men and 36.0% in women). Conclusions: People with disabilities report experiencing a significantly high lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence compared with people without disabilities. The results warrant policy and practice changes to identify early signs of abuse and intervene accordingly and warrant an investment in targeted violence prevention programs. (Authors' abstract). Record #7244
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American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2021, Advance online publication, 21 July 2021

Introduction: There is no population-based study on prevalence rates for all forms of intimate partner violence experienced by people with different types of disabilities in New Zealand. This study compares the reported lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence (physical, sexual, psychological, controlling behaviors, and economic abuse) for people with different types of disabilities with that reported by those without disabilities and tests whether there is a gender difference.

Methods: From March 2017 to March 2019, a total of 2,888 women and men aged ≥16 years participated in a cross-sectional study in New Zealand using a cluster random sampling method. Face-to-face interviews were used for data collection. The WHO Multi-country Study questionnaire was employed as the data collection tool. Logistic regression was conducted, and AORs were reported.

Results: Those with any disability reported significantly higher rates of most forms of intimate partner violence than those without disabilities, among both genders, including physical intimate partner violence (AOR=1.80, 95% CI=1.32, 2.47 for women, AOR=2.44, 95% CI=1.72, 3.45 for men) and psychological and economic abuse. Women with disabilities were more likely to report experiences of sexual intimate partner violence than men (range =13.5-17.1% vs 4.0%–21.2% in men). Men with intellectual disability were more likely to report physical intimate partner violence than women with intellectual disability (60.5% in men and 36.0% in women).

Conclusions: People with disabilities report experiencing a significantly high lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence compared with people without disabilities. The results warrant policy and practice changes to identify early signs of abuse and intervene accordingly and warrant an investment in targeted violence prevention programs. (Authors' abstract). Record #7244