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‘Why would you give your children to something you don’t trust? ’ : Rangatahi health and social services and the pursuit of tino rangatiratanga Cinnamon Lindsay Latimer, Jade Le Grice, Logan Hamley, Lara Greaves, Ashlea Gillon, Shiloh Groot, Madhavi Manchi, Larissa Renfrew & Terryann C. Clark

By: Latimer, Cinnamon Lindsay.
Contributor(s): Le Grice, Jade | Hamley, Logan | Greaves, Lara | Gillon, Ashlea | Groot, Shiloh | Manchi, Madhavi | Renfrew, Larissa | Clark. Terryann C.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online.Publisher: Taylor & Francis, 2021Subject(s): CHILD WELFARE | HEALTH | MĀORI | SOCIAL SERVICES | YOUNG PEOPLE | HAUORA | ORA | RANGAHAU MĀORI | TAITAMARIKI | TAIOHI | TOKO I TE ORA | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: DOI: 10.1080/1177083X.2021.1993938 In: Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online, 2021, Published online, 11 November 2021Summary: Persistent health inequities between rangatahi Māori (Indigenous young people) and other young people within Aotearoa New Zealand are incurred by a colonial machinery of institutions, service systems and sociocultural contexts that facilitates the marginalisation of Māori. Despite a skilled and dedicated Māori workforce, current service contexts severely limit the innovation of Māori practitioners working from a basis of mātauranga Māori (Māori ways of knowing and being), and curtail their ability to support rangatahi Māori and their whānau (community of related families). We report on an interview study with 13 Māori practitioners in youth development, exploring their struggles, strengths and strategies, as part of a larger project exploring rangatahi wellbeing and whanaungatanga (connectedness and relationality). Utilising reflexive thematic analysis, we describe three conceptual domains that participant accounts spoke into: mitigating system failures to embrace rangatahi and their whānau, sustainability and longevity of services for rangatahi Māori, and fostering rangatahi tino rangatiratanga. Participant accounts illustrate the need for bold reform within youth services, towards sustainable models premised upon tino rangatiratanga – services led by Māori, designed by Māori, and intended to cater for the unique needs and aspirations of rangatahi Māori. (Authors' abstract). Record #7387
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Kōtuitui: New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online, 2021, Published online, 11 November 2021

Persistent health inequities between rangatahi Māori (Indigenous young people) and other young people within Aotearoa New Zealand are incurred by a colonial machinery of institutions, service systems and sociocultural contexts that facilitates the marginalisation of Māori. Despite a skilled and dedicated Māori workforce, current service contexts severely limit the innovation of Māori practitioners working from a basis of mātauranga Māori (Māori ways of knowing and being), and curtail their ability to support rangatahi Māori and their whānau (community of related families). We report on an interview study with 13 Māori practitioners in youth development, exploring their struggles, strengths and strategies, as part of a larger project exploring rangatahi wellbeing and whanaungatanga (connectedness and relationality). Utilising reflexive thematic analysis, we describe three conceptual domains that participant accounts spoke into: mitigating system failures to embrace rangatahi and their whānau, sustainability and longevity of services for rangatahi Māori, and fostering rangatahi tino rangatiratanga. Participant accounts illustrate the need for bold reform within youth services, towards sustainable models premised upon tino rangatiratanga – services led by Māori, designed by Māori, and intended to cater for the unique needs and aspirations of rangatahi Māori. (Authors' abstract). Record #7387