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The murmuration of information disorders : Aotearoa New Zealand mis- and disinformation ecologies and the Parliament Protest. Working paper Kate Hannah, Sanjana Hattotuwa and Kayli Taylor

By: Hannah, Kate.
Contributor(s): Hattotuwa, Sanjana | Taylor, Kayli.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : Te Pūnaha Matatini, 2022Description: electronic document (22 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): COVID-19 | The Disinformation Project | MISOGYNY | PANDEMICS | POLITICS | SOCIAL MEDIA | VIOLENCE | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Download repot, PDF | About The Disinformation Project Summary: In our November 2021 public report, The Disinformation Project (TDP) described and analysed the nurture, nature and significant nodes of disinformation in Aotearoa New Zealand since August 2021. We noted a set of tipping points: shifts from vaccine hesitancy to vaccine resistance, increasingly competing ideas regarding State versus individual rights, and the normalisation of the targeting of individuals and communities with online and offline harassment. We also noted the prevalence of a range of tactics: the use of memetic material and testimony to spark humour and strong emotion, language usage and genre difference by platform, and overall an increase in dangerous speech.8 These tipping points and tactics played out with stronger emphasis during the Parliament protest. The Parliament Protest was unlike any other event, process or domestic development studied by {From the report). Record #7637
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Released 18 May 2022

In our November 2021 public report, The Disinformation Project (TDP) described and analysed the nurture, nature and significant nodes of disinformation in Aotearoa New
Zealand since August 2021. We noted a set of tipping points: shifts from vaccine hesitancy to vaccine resistance, increasingly competing ideas regarding State versus individual rights, and the normalisation of the targeting of individuals and communities with online and offline harassment. We also noted the prevalence of a range of tactics: the use of memetic
material and testimony to spark humour and strong emotion, language usage and genre difference by platform, and overall an increase in dangerous speech.8 These tipping points
and tactics played out with stronger emphasis during the Parliament protest. The Parliament Protest was unlike any other event, process or domestic development studied by
{From the report). Record #7637