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Kia Tika, Kia Pono - Honouring Truths : Susan P. Kemp, Hunia Te Urukiata Mackay, Michelle Egan-Bitran, Paula Toko King, Amanda Smith, Shana Valente, Carmel West, Tupua Urlich, Zak Quor, Jennifer Prapaiporn Thonrithi, Kiri Phillips, Carolyn Phillips, Isaac Heron, Saron Bekele and Stanley Baldwin ensuring the participatory rights of tamariki and rangatahi who are care experienced

By: Kemp, Susan P.
Contributor(s): Mackay, Hunia Te Urukiata | Egan-Britran, Michelle | King, Paula Toko | Smith, Amanda | Valente, Shane | West, Carmel | Urlich, Tupua | Quor, Zak | Thonrithi, Jennifer Prapaiporn | Phillips, Kim | Phillips, Carolyn | Heron, Isaac | Bekele, Saron | Baldwin, Stanley.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleSeries: Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand.Publisher: Taylor & Francis, 2022Subject(s): VOYCE - Whakarongo Mai | CHILDREN | CHILD PROTECTION | CHILDREN'S RIGHTS | CHILDREN'S VOICES | CHILDREN'S RIGHTS | FOSTER CARE | INSTITUTIONAL VIOLENCE | MĀORI | ORA | RANGAHAU MĀORI | RESEARCH ETHICS | TAIOHI | TAMARIKI | WELLBEING | YOUNG PEOPLE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: DOI: 10.1080/03036758.2022.2094968 | Read the Kia Tika, Kia Pono – Honouring Truths framework In: Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 2022, First published online, 27 July 2022. Special issue: Child health and well-beingSummary: This paper provides an overview of ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono – Honouring Truths’ (Te Rōpū Arotahi 2022), an ethical framework to guide engagement with tamariki (children) and rangatahi (young people) who are care experienced (that is, who currently or at some stage in their lives have been in foster or residential care). Centring the voices and priorities of rangatahi with care experience, ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono’ is intended for use by organisations and others working across the range of sectors and services that seek to engage tamariki and rangatahi who are care experienced in governance, policy making, service design, media or research. Its purpose is to ensure that these efforts are ethical, meaningful, and culturally safe. Grounded in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and participatory rights frameworks, ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono’ is responsive to the cultural context of New Zealand. It is also distinctive in its centring of rangatahi with care experience as both knowledge-holders and knowledge-creators. In summarising the key elements of the ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono’ framework, we also draw upon our insights from the research process regarding participatory practice with rangatahi with care experience. (Authors' abstract). Record #7765
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Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 2022, First published online, 27 July 2022

This paper provides an overview of ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono – Honouring Truths’ (Te Rōpū Arotahi 2022), an ethical framework to guide engagement with tamariki (children) and rangatahi (young people) who are care experienced (that is, who currently or at some stage in their lives have been in foster or residential care). Centring the voices and priorities of rangatahi with care experience, ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono’ is intended for use by organisations and others working across the range of sectors and services that seek to engage tamariki and rangatahi who are care experienced in governance, policy making, service design, media or research. Its purpose is to ensure that these efforts are ethical, meaningful, and culturally safe. Grounded in Te Tiriti o Waitangi and participatory rights frameworks, ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono’ is responsive to the cultural context of New Zealand. It is also distinctive in its centring of rangatahi with care experience as both knowledge-holders and knowledge-creators. In summarising the key elements of the ‘Kia Tika, Kia Pono’ framework, we also draw upon our insights from the research process regarding participatory practice with rangatahi with care experience. (Authors' abstract). Record #7765