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Kia Tika, Kia Pono - Honouring Truths : Te Rōpū Arotahi. Members include: Susan Kemp and Michelle Egan-Bitran (Waipapa Taumata Rau/University of Auckland); Paula Toko King (Te Rōpū Rangahau Hauora a Eru Pōmare, University of Otago, Wellington); Hunia Te Urukaiata Mackay, Amanda Smith, and Shana Valente (VOYCE – Whakarongo Mai); Stanley Baldwin, Saron Bekele, Isaac Heron, Carolyn Phillips, Kiri Phillips, Jennifer Prapaiporn Thonrithi, Zak Quor, Tupua Urlich and Carmel West (Rangatahi research team members). an ethical framework for engaging with children and young people who are care experienced

By: Kemp, Susan P.
Contributor(s): Mackay, Hunia Te Urukiata | Egan-Britran, Michelle | King, Paula Toko | Smith, Amanda | Valente, Shane | West, Carmel | Urlich, Tupua | Quor, Zak | Thonrithi, Jennifer Prapaiporn | Phillips, Kim | Phillips, Carolyn | Heron, Isaac | Bekele, Saron | Baldwin, Stanley.
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticlePublisher: Voyce: Whakarongo Mai, 2022Description: electronic document ; ePub & Word DOCX.Subject(s): VOYCE - Whakarongo Mai | CHILDREN | CHILD PROTECTION | CHILDREN'S RIGHTS | CHILDREN'S VOICES | CHILDREN'S RIGHTS | FOSTER CARE | INSTITUTIONAL VIOLENCE | MĀORI | ORA | RANGAHAU MĀORI | RESEARCH ETHICS | TAIOHI | TAMARIKI | WELLBEING | YOUNG PEOPLE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: Kia Tika, Kia Pono is an ethical framework to guide the planning and practice of adults who seek to engage with and learn from children and young people (tamariki and rangatahi) who are care experienced (that is, who currently or at some stage in their life have been in foster or residential care). In particular, it is intended to guide the practice of adults seeking input from tamariki and rangatahi with care experience in the context of research, governance, policy making, and service design. It is also relevant to social workers and other service providers who work with individual tamariki and rangatahi. However, this is not its primary focus. The purpose of Kia Tika, Kia Pono is to ensure that adults and organisations who engage with children and young people who are care experienced understand what is means to do this in ways that are ethical and culturally safe. Kia Tika, Kia Pono was co-created by rangatahi/young people who are care experienced, staff members from VOYCE-Whakarongo Mai, and researchers from Waipapa Taumata Rau/ The University of Auckland and Te Rōpū Rangahau Hauora a Eru Pōmare, University of Otago, Wellington. It is designed to be used by organisations and adults across the range of sectors and services that typically engage with children and young people who have care experience. These include (but are not limited to) child, youth, and family services, healthcare, mental health and addiction services, disability services, education, and justice. It will also be useful in other sectors that seek to hear and learn from diverse groups of children and young people, including researchers, the media, and the private sector. (From the document). Record #7766
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Kia Tika, Kia Pono is an ethical framework to guide the planning and practice of adults who seek to engage with and learn from children and young people (tamariki and rangatahi) who are care experienced (that is, who currently or at some stage in their life have been in foster or residential care). In particular, it is intended to guide the practice of adults seeking input from tamariki and rangatahi with care experience in the context of research, governance, policy making, and service design. It is also relevant to social workers and other service providers who work with individual tamariki and rangatahi. However, this is not its primary focus.
The purpose of Kia Tika, Kia Pono is to ensure that adults and organisations who engage with children and young people who are care experienced understand what is means to do this in ways that are ethical and culturally safe.
Kia Tika, Kia Pono was co-created by rangatahi/young people who are care experienced, staff members from VOYCE-Whakarongo Mai, and researchers from Waipapa Taumata Rau/ The University of Auckland and Te Rōpū Rangahau Hauora a Eru Pōmare, University of Otago, Wellington. It is designed to be used by organisations and adults across the range of sectors and services that typically engage with children and young people who have care experience. These include (but are not limited to) child, youth, and family services, healthcare, mental health and addiction services, disability services, education, and justice. It will also be useful in other sectors that seek to hear and learn from diverse groups of children and young people, including researchers, the media, and the private sector. (From the document). Record #7766