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A stalking law for New Zealand : why it is necessary and what it should look like Alison Towns, Natalie Thorburn and Bernice Williams

By: Towns, Alison.
Contributor(s): Thorburn, Natalie | Williams, Bernice.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland, New Zealand : Auckland Coalition for the Safety of Women and Children, 2022Description: electronic document (14 pages) ; PDF file.Subject(s): Auckland Coalition for the Safety of Women and Children | National Collective of Independent Women's Refuges | National Council of Women of New Zealand | Te Kaunihera Wahine O Aotearoa | CRIMES | DOMESTIC VIOLENCE | Family Violence Act 2018 | Harassment Act 1997 | Harmful Digital Communications Act 2015 | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | LAW REFORM | LEGISLATION | PRIVACY ACT 1993 | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | STALKING | TECHNOLOGY-FACILITATED ABUSE | VICTIMS OF CRIMES | VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: Read policy brief, PDF | Read AWC blog (7/2/2023) Summary: Stalking Law for NZ, Nov 2022, ACSWC, & NCIWR. 1 A STALKING LAW FOR NEW ZEALAND: Why it is necessary and what it should look like November 2022 Policy briefing from • Auckland Coalition for the Safety of Women and Children • National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges • National Council of Women of New Zealand, Te Kaunihera Wāhine o Aotearoa Key authors: Alison Towns (ACSWC), Natalie Thorburn (NCIWR) and Bernice Williams Summary Stalking is unwanted repetitive and persistent intrusions into a person’s life: it is a form of abuse that is a risk factor for physical and sexual violence, including death. Even if a single action appears trivial, stalking is a pattern of behaviour, which a reasonable person would find distressing, or objectionable or frightening. Women are disproportionately affected by stalking, particularly young women, disabled women, rainbow women and likely wāhine Māori, while migrants and ethnic minorities may experience unique forms of stalking. The most dangerous, and persistent stalking is conducted by ex-partners of women, with child contact being a particular risk factor. The targeting of women participating in public discourse (politicians, journalists, celebrities) may dissuade others from speaking out, preventing women from contributing their expertise and thought leadership to public discourse. (From the document). Record #8002
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Access online Access online Family Violence library
Online Available ON23020022

Policy briefing from
• Auckland Coalition for the Safety of Women and Children,
• National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges, &
• National Council of Women of New Zealand, Te Kaunihera Wāhine o Aotearoa, published November 2022

Stalking Law for NZ, Nov 2022, ACSWC, & NCIWR.
1
A STALKING LAW FOR NEW ZEALAND:
Why it is necessary and what it should look like
November 2022
Policy briefing from
• Auckland Coalition for the Safety of Women and Children
• National Collective of Independent Women’s Refuges
• National Council of Women of New Zealand, Te Kaunihera Wāhine o Aotearoa
Key authors: Alison Towns (ACSWC), Natalie Thorburn (NCIWR) and Bernice Williams
Summary
Stalking is unwanted repetitive and persistent intrusions into a person’s life: it is a form of abuse
that is a risk factor for physical and sexual violence, including death. Even if a single action appears trivial, stalking is a pattern of behaviour, which a reasonable person would find
distressing, or objectionable or frightening.

Women are disproportionately affected by stalking, particularly young women, disabled women, rainbow women and likely wāhine Māori, while migrants and ethnic minorities may
experience unique forms of stalking. The most dangerous, and persistent stalking is conducted by ex-partners of women, with child contact being a particular risk factor. The targeting of
women participating in public discourse (politicians, journalists, celebrities) may dissuade others from speaking out, preventing women from contributing their expertise and thought leadership to public discourse. (From the document). Record #8002