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“Get out of my home and don’t come back!” : empowering women through self-defense prepared by Elaine Mossman and Jan Jordan

By: Mossman, Elaine.
Contributor(s): Jordan, Jan.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Violence Against Women.Publisher: Sage, 2019Subject(s): Women's Self Defence Network - Wāhine Toa | National Collective of Independent Women's Refuges | ABUSED WOMEN | EVALUATION | INTERVENTION | INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE | PHYSICAL ABUSE | SELF DEFENCE | SUPPORT SERVICES | WOMEN'S REFUGES | YOUNG WOMEN | PREVENTION | FAMILY VIOLENCE | SEXUAL VIOLENCE | NEW ZEALANDOnline resources: DOI: 10.1177/1077801218768712 | Access article online In: Violence Against Women, 2019, 25(3), 313-336Summary: Can self-defense courses empower those already victimized? This article explores the potential for self-defense courses to have specific efficacy in the prevention of intimate partner violence (IPV). It draws on interview (n = 36) and pre- and postevaluation (n = 44) data from two studies: (a) evaluation of a pilot study of a feminist empowerment self-defense course designed specifically for women’s refuge/shelter clients (Violence Prevention Project [VPP]) and (b) evaluation of women’s self-defense courses collected as part of a larger evaluation study (Skills for Safety). The overwhelmingly positive findings from both studies suggest greater consideration be offered to providing further collaborative refuge/self-defense courses for women victimized by IPV. (Authors' abstract). Record #8433
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Violence Against Women, 2019, 25(3), 313-336

Can self-defense courses empower those already victimized? This article explores the potential for self-defense courses to have specific efficacy in the prevention of intimate partner violence (IPV). It draws on interview (n = 36) and pre- and postevaluation (n = 44) data from two studies: (a) evaluation of a pilot study of a feminist empowerment self-defense course designed specifically for women’s refuge/shelter clients (Violence Prevention Project [VPP]) and (b) evaluation of women’s self-defense courses collected as part of a larger evaluation study (Skills for Safety). The overwhelmingly positive findings from both studies suggest greater consideration be offered to providing further collaborative refuge/self-defense courses for women victimized by IPV. (Authors' abstract). Record #8433